Discussion:
Dirty Politics — Nixon, Watergate, and the JFK Assassination by Mark Tracy
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Raymond
2011-07-29 20:45:23 UTC
Permalink
TahoeBlue:
More "Bay of Pigs" = "Kennedy's murder"

Quote

Kendall began working for Pepsi after WWII, rising to Vice President
by the 1950s, when he was instrumental in opening the Soviet market to
the soft drink.

http://mtracy9.tripod.com/kennedy.html
Dirty Politics — Nixon, Watergate, and the JFK Assassination by Mark
Tracy
...
Dallas journalist Jim Marrs gives this account: "With Nixon in Dallas
was Pepsi-Cola heiress and actress Joan Crawford. Both Nixon and
Crawford made comments in the Dallas newspapers to the effect that
they, unlike the President, didn't need Secret Service protection, and
they intimated that the nation was upset with Kennedy's policies. It
has been suggested that this taunting may have been responsible for
Kennedy's critical decision not to order the Plexiglas top placed on
his limousine on November 22."

[Notes: The Pepsi-Cola company had a sugar plantation and factory in
Cuba, which the Cuban government nationalized in 1960; CIA contract
agent Chauncey Holt told Newsweek magazine in 1991 that Pepsi-Cola
President Donald Kendall was "considered by the CIA to be the eyes and
ears of the CIA" in the Caribbean; a photograph taken on November 21,
1963 -- the day before the assassination -- shows Donald Kendall
meeting with Richard Nixon in Dallas. Click to view]*

Other facts linking Nixon to the JFK assassination emerged years later
during the Watergate conspiracy, some of which were revealed by
Nixon's former chief of staff, H. R. Haldeman in his memoir, The Ends
of Power. Haldeman cites several conversations where Nixon expressed
concern about the Watergate affair becoming public knowledge and where
this exposure might lead. Haldeman writes:

"In fact, I was puzzled when he [Nixon] told me, 'Tell Ehrlichman this
whole group of Cubans [Watergate burglars] is tied to the Bay of
Pigs.' After a pause I said, 'The Bay of Pigs? What does that have to
do with this [the Watergate burglary]?' But Nixon merely said,
'Ehrlichman will know what I mean,' and dropped the subject."

Later in his book, Haldeman appears to answer his own question when he
says, "It seems that in all of those Nixon references to the Bay of
Pigs, he was actually referring to the Kennedy assassination."

If Haldeman's interpretation is correct, then Nixon's instructions for
him to, "Tell Ehrlichman this whole group of [anti-Castro] Cubans is
tied to the Bay of Pigs," was Nixon's way of telling him to inform
Ehrlichman that the Watergate burglars were tied to Kennedy's murder.
(It should be noted that many Cuban exiles blamed Kennedy for the
failure to overthrow Castro at the Bay of Pigs, pointing to Kennedy's
refusal to allow the U.S. military to launch a full-scale invasion of
the island.)

Haldeman also links the Central Intelligence Agency to the Watergate
burglars and, by implication, to the Kennedy assassination. Haldeman
writes, "...at least one of the burglars, [Eugenio] Martinez, was
still on the CIA payroll on June 17, 1972 -- and almost certainly was
reporting to his CIA case officer about the proposed break-in even
before it happened [his italics]."

The other Watergate conspirators were G. Gordon Liddy, Bernard Barker,
Frank Sturgis, Virgilio Gonzales and ex-CIA agents James McCord and E.
Howard Hunt. Hunt's relationship with the anti-Castro Cubans traces
back to the early 1960s, to his days with the Central Intelligence
Agency. As a CIA political officer and propaganda expert, Hunt helped
plan the Bays of Pigs operation and also helped create the Cuban
Revolutionary Council -- a militant anti-Castro organization. Hunt
would later retire from the CIA (at least ostensibly) to become covert
operations chief for the Nixon White House. [Note: Hunt maintained a
working relationship with the Central Intelligence Agency even after
his "retirement," obtaining camera equipment and disguises from the
CIA's Technical Services Division for use in the Watergate burglary.]

Several reports over the years have placed Hunt in Dallas at the time
of the Kennedy assassination. In 1974, the Rockefeller Commission
concluded that Hunt used eleven hours of sick leave from the CIA in
the two-week period preceding the assassination. Later, eyewitness
Marita Lorenz testified under oath that she saw Hunt pay off an
assassination team in Dallas the night before Kennedy's murder. (Hunt
v. Liberty Lobby; U.S. District Court for the Southern District of
Florida; 1985) Click to read transcript

In taped conversations with Haldeman, Nixon is obviously worried about
what would happen if Hunt's involvement in the Watergate conspiracy
came to light. Nixon says, "Of course, this Hunt, that will uncover a
lot of things. You open that scab, there's a hell of a lot of things,
and we feel that it would be very detrimental to have this thing go
any further ... the President's belief is that this is going to open
the whole Bay of Pigs thing up again." Click to Listen: Nixon
instructs Haldeman on what to tell the CIA (text below)

NIXON: When you get in to see these people, say: "Look, the problem is
that this will open the whole, the whole Bay of Pigs thing, and the
President just feels that..." ah, I mean, without going into the
details of, of lying to them to the extent to say that there is no
involvement. But, you can say, "This is sort of a comedy of errors,
bizarre," without getting into it, "The President's belief is that
this is going to open the whole Bay of Pigs thing up again. And, ah
because ah these people are playing for, for keeps and that they
should call the FBI in and we feel that ... that we wish for the
country, don't go any further into this case, period!"

Following instructions, Haldeman informed CIA Director Richard Helms
of Nixon's concern that the Watergate investigation would "open the
whole Bay of Pigs thing up again." Haldeman gives this account of what
transpired next:

"Turmoil in the room. Helms, gripping the arms of his chair, leaning
forward and shouting, 'The Bay of Pigs had nothing to do with this. I
have no concern about the Bay of Pigs.'

"Silence. I just sat there. I was absolutely shocked by Helms' violent
reaction. Again I wondered, what was such dynamite in the Bay of Pigs
story?"

Eleven days after Hunt's arrest for the Watergate burglary, L. Patrick
Gray, acting FBI Director, was called to the White House and told by
Nixon aide John Ehrlichman to "deep six" written files taken from
Hunt's personal safe. The FBI Director was told that the files were
"political dynamite and clearly should not see the light of day." Gray
responded by taking the material home and burning it in his fireplace.
John Dean, council to the president, acted similarly by shredding
Hunt's operational diary.

Futhermore, as former White House correspondent Don Fulsom reveals,
"The newest Nixon tapes are studded with deletions -- segments deemed
by government censors as too sensitive for public scrutiny. 'National
Security' is cited. Not surprisingly, such deletions often occur
during discussions involving the Bay of Pigs, E. Howard Hunt, and John
F. Kennedy.

One of the most tantalizing nuggets about Nixon's possible inside
knowledge of JFK assassination secrets was buried on a White House
tape until 2002. On the tape, recorded in May of 1972, the president
confided to two top aides that the Warren Commission pulled off 'the
greatest hoax that has ever been perpetuated.' Unfortunately, he did
not elaborate."

TahoeBlue:
l***@gmail.com
2013-01-28 05:37:54 UTC
Permalink
Post by Raymond
More "Bay of Pigs" = "Kennedy's murder"
Quote
Kendall began working for Pepsi after WWII, rising to Vice President
by the 1950s, when he was instrumental in opening the Soviet market to
the soft drink.
http://mtracy9.tripod.com/kennedy.html
Dirty Politics — Nixon, Watergate, and the JFK Assassination by Mark
Tracy
...
Dallas journalist Jim Marrs gives this account: "With Nixon in Dallas
was Pepsi-Cola heiress and actress Joan Crawford. Both Nixon and
Crawford made comments in the Dallas newspapers to the effect that
they, unlike the President, didn't need Secret Service protection, and
they intimated that the nation was upset with Kennedy's policies. It
has been suggested that this taunting may have been responsible for
Kennedy's critical decision not to order the Plexiglas top placed on
his limousine on November 22."
[Notes: The Pepsi-Cola company had a sugar plantation and factory in
Cuba, which the Cuban government nationalized in 1960; CIA contract
agent Chauncey Holt told Newsweek magazine in 1991 that Pepsi-Cola
President Donald Kendall was "considered by the CIA to be the eyes and
ears of the CIA" in the Caribbean; a photograph taken on November 21,
1963 -- the day before the assassination -- shows Donald Kendall
meeting with Richard Nixon in Dallas. Click to view]*
Other facts linking Nixon to the JFK assassination emerged years later
during the Watergate conspiracy, some of which were revealed by
Nixon's former chief of staff, H. R. Haldeman in his memoir, The Ends
of Power. Haldeman cites several conversations where Nixon expressed
concern about the Watergate affair becoming public knowledge and where
"In fact, I was puzzled when he [Nixon] told me, 'Tell Ehrlichman this
whole group of Cubans [Watergate burglars] is tied to the Bay of
Pigs.' After a pause I said, 'The Bay of Pigs? What does that have to
do with this [the Watergate burglary]?' But Nixon merely said,
'Ehrlichman will know what I mean,' and dropped the subject."
Later in his book, Haldeman appears to answer his own question when he
says, "It seems that in all of those Nixon references to the Bay of
Pigs, he was actually referring to the Kennedy assassination."
If Haldeman's interpretation is correct, then Nixon's instructions for
him to, "Tell Ehrlichman this whole group of [anti-Castro] Cubans is
tied to the Bay of Pigs," was Nixon's way of telling him to inform
Ehrlichman that the Watergate burglars were tied to Kennedy's murder.
(It should be noted that many Cuban exiles blamed Kennedy for the
failure to overthrow Castro at the Bay of Pigs, pointing to Kennedy's
refusal to allow the U.S. military to launch a full-scale invasion of
the island.)
Haldeman also links the Central Intelligence Agency to the Watergate
burglars and, by implication, to the Kennedy assassination. Haldeman
writes, "...at least one of the burglars, [Eugenio] Martinez, was
still on the CIA payroll on June 17, 1972 -- and almost certainly was
reporting to his CIA case officer about the proposed break-in even
before it happened [his italics]."
The other Watergate conspirators were G. Gordon Liddy, Bernard Barker,
Frank Sturgis, Virgilio Gonzales and ex-CIA agents James McCord and E.
Howard Hunt. Hunt's relationship with the anti-Castro Cubans traces
back to the early 1960s, to his days with the Central Intelligence
Agency. As a CIA political officer and propaganda expert, Hunt helped
plan the Bays of Pigs operation and also helped create the Cuban
Revolutionary Council -- a militant anti-Castro organization. Hunt
would later retire from the CIA (at least ostensibly) to become covert
operations chief for the Nixon White House. [Note: Hunt maintained a
working relationship with the Central Intelligence Agency even after
his "retirement," obtaining camera equipment and disguises from the
CIA's Technical Services Division for use in the Watergate burglary.]
Several reports over the years have placed Hunt in Dallas at the time
of the Kennedy assassination. In 1974, the Rockefeller Commission
concluded that Hunt used eleven hours of sick leave from the CIA in
the two-week period preceding the assassination. Later, eyewitness
Marita Lorenz testified under oath that she saw Hunt pay off an
assassination team in Dallas the night before Kennedy's murder. (Hunt
v. Liberty Lobby; U.S. District Court for the Southern District of
Florida; 1985) Click to read transcript
In taped conversations with Haldeman, Nixon is obviously worried about
what would happen if Hunt's involvement in the Watergate conspiracy
came to light. Nixon says, "Of course, this Hunt, that will uncover a
lot of things. You open that scab, there's a hell of a lot of things,
and we feel that it would be very detrimental to have this thing go
any further ... the President's belief is that this is going to open
the whole Bay of Pigs thing up again." Click to Listen: Nixon
instructs Haldeman on what to tell the CIA (text below)
NIXON: When you get in to see these people, say: "Look, the problem is
that this will open the whole, the whole Bay of Pigs thing, and the
President just feels that..." ah, I mean, without going into the
details of, of lying to them to the extent to say that there is no
involvement. But, you can say, "This is sort of a comedy of errors,
bizarre," without getting into it, "The President's belief is that
this is going to open the whole Bay of Pigs thing up again. And, ah
because ah these people are playing for, for keeps and that they
should call the FBI in and we feel that ... that we wish for the
country, don't go any further into this case, period!"
Following instructions, Haldeman informed CIA Director Richard Helms
of Nixon's concern that the Watergate investigation would "open the
whole Bay of Pigs thing up again." Haldeman gives this account of what
"Turmoil in the room. Helms, gripping the arms of his chair, leaning
forward and shouting, 'The Bay of Pigs had nothing to do with this. I
have no concern about the Bay of Pigs.'
"Silence. I just sat there. I was absolutely shocked by Helms' violent
reaction. Again I wondered, what was such dynamite in the Bay of Pigs
story?"
Eleven days after Hunt's arrest for the Watergate burglary, L. Patrick
Gray, acting FBI Director, was called to the White House and told by
Nixon aide John Ehrlichman to "deep six" written files taken from
Hunt's personal safe. The FBI Director was told that the files were
"political dynamite and clearly should not see the light of day." Gray
responded by taking the material home and burning it in his fireplace.
John Dean, council to the president, acted similarly by shredding
Hunt's operational diary.
Futhermore, as former White House correspondent Don Fulsom reveals,
"The newest Nixon tapes are studded with deletions -- segments deemed
by government censors as too sensitive for public scrutiny. 'National
Security' is cited. Not surprisingly, such deletions often occur
during discussions involving the Bay of Pigs, E. Howard Hunt, and John
F. Kennedy.
One of the most tantalizing nuggets about Nixon's possible inside
knowledge of JFK assassination secrets was buried on a White House
tape until 2002. On the tape, recorded in May of 1972, the president
confided to two top aides that the Warren Commission pulled off 'the
greatest hoax that has ever been perpetuated.' Unfortunately, he did
not elaborate."
'The Alabama Project' - Nixon's assassination team.
another one of Nixon's "dirty tricks."


I write you about some intriguing material I have in my possession written by a key player in the George Wallace campaign of 1972.

These historic documents were written by Seymore Trammell, Campaign Director and confidant to Governor George Wallace, including memos of then Attorney General John Mitchell and other primary sources, revealing how George Bush Sr. dispatched George W. Bush as an undercover operative to spy on the Wallace campaign.

After his release from Maxwell Federal Prison Camp, Seymore was able to add events to his manuscript that concern the conspiracy and subsequent attempt to assassinate him on October of 1971 in Montgomery, Alabama, and Governor George Wallace on May 15th, 1972 in Laurel, Maryland at his Presidential campaign speech.

Shortly after Seymore got out of the Maxwell Federal Prison Camp, he was contacted by Dr. Dan T. Carter, one of the nation’s foremost historians on U.S. and Southern history.

Carter needed information on Wallace and his relationship with Richard Nixon. He knew the most reliable source for obtaining what he needed for his book was from the man responsible for the Governor’s success.

Trammell decided to work with Dr. Carter because he was a famous Southern Historian and history professor who had the necessary resources to publish his manuscript.

Seymore and his son met with Dr. Carter several times and agreed to give him a copy of the manuscript he had written while in prison. Seymore and his son, Warren, spent numerous hours with Carter verifying this important piece of history.

Carter had spent millions of dollars of his publisher, Simon & Schuster’s, money on lawyers to obtain the IRS files and necessary investigation into the ‘Alabama Project.’

Seymore’s manuscript could have been the most shocking piece of history of its time! However, because of the incriminating nature of Trammell’s documents, Simon & Schuster would not allow Seymore’s story to be included in Carter’s book, the “Politics of Rage.”

Needless to say, Carter and Trammell were devastated! This important piece of history was left completely verified, but still untold!

Carter credited Seymore in his book, “Seymore Trammell, George Wallace’s most influential political adviser and state cabinet officer in the 1960′s, generously spent several days with me sharing his memories and his knowledge of those years. In all our extensive interviews, I never found an instance in which he misled me. He has his own fascinating story and I hope he will eventually have a chance to tell it.”
Source – The Politics of Rage page 559.

Now, 40 years later, Trammell’s historic accounts have yet to be revealed to the public.

Seymore’s manuscript, ‘Madness in the Magnolias,’ is a significant game-changer to the Watergate story.

Trammell and Carter knew Watergate was brilliantly crafted by the Nixon administration. It was far less painful for Nixon to step down as President than going to prison for attempting to assassinate a State Governor/Presidential Candidate and his Campaign Director.

I have shared Trammell’s manuscript with numerous historians and authors, in the hopes to finally get his story published.
Both the Nixon Presidential Library & Museum and John F. Kennedy Presidential Library & Museum are considering adding Trammell's manuscript to their archives.


If you would be interested in reviewing Trammell's manuscript please contact....etc.

See more here - http://lisaleaks.com/2012/10/18/the-alabama-project/



Thank you for your time and consideration,
Lisa


Lisa Elkins Goodman
Literary Agent/Investigative Journalist
'Madness in the Magnolias'
(719) 671-5981

http://lisaleaks.com/2012/10/18/the-alabama-project/

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