Discussion:
The "changed motorcade route" is a factoid !
(too old to reply)
Raymond
2012-01-22 15:09:50 UTC
Permalink
The basic decision to visit Texas was made by the President, the
Vice-President Lyndon Johnson and John B. Connally Jr. The Governor of
Texas on JUNE 5, 1963, at the Cortez Hotel in El Paso, Texas.
(p.28 WR)
Dallas Before the Visit
" The two Dallas newspapers provided their readers with a steady
stream of information and speculation about the trip, beginning on
September 13, when the Times-Herald announced in a front page article
that President Kennedy was planning a brief 1-day tour of four cities-
Dallas, Fort Worth, San Antonio, and Houston. Both Dallas papers cited
White House sources on September 26 as confirming the President's
intention to visit Texas on November 21 and 22, with Dallas scheduled
as one of the stops. (p. 40 WR )

Even though an APRIL article (CE 1972) was the first public
announcement for a fall visit, explicit details were not resolved. The
Commission believed that it would be unreasonable to believe that the
eventual events of Nov. 22 could have been planned as early as April
since the location of the luncheon was not decided until Nov. 14. It
would have been impossible for Oswald, or any other conspirators to
plan the ambush on Dealey Plaza. The Commission concluded that Lee's
job at the TSBD was a coincidence and his recent employment (Oct 16 )
in the building had nothing to do with the assassination.

The Secret Service examined three potential sights for the
luncheon:One building, Market Hall was not available for Nov. 22; the
second, the Woman's Building, at the State Fair Grounds was not
selected because it lacked food handling facilities and had
otherdisadvantages. The Trade Mart was decided on and the parade route
was selected and agreed on November 14.

The luncheon site was not an issue in the final results because the
Trade Mart and Market Hall were in the same section of Dallas. The
motorcade route would not have changed if Market Hall had been the
choice.

On NOV. 8, the decision was made to allot 45 minutes to the parade
from Love Field to the luncheon site. The route selected measured 10
miles and could be covered in the 45 minutes. From the Trade Mart,
back to the airport, was only four miles, by the most direct route.
The route selected impressed the agents as a natural and desirable
one. Franklin Roosevelt had used almost the same route in 1936. It had
wide streets and guaranteed that the largest crowds would be afforded
the opportunity to see the President." WR

There were charges that the route was changed to take the President
past the TSBD . This is absurd. Anyone living in Dallas knows that the
only direct access to the Trade Mart or Market Hall was via Houston
Street from Main Street.

Guaranteed, if the luncheon was going to be held on the runway of
Love Field, there would have been a parade down Main Street and in
front of the TSBD at 12;30 pm on November 22, 1963.

Even the final authority on the assassination, Gerald Posner, got it
all wrong. He said that " While Oswald was on a twenty hour bus ride
that consumed all of September 26, a White House spokesman made the
FIRST ANNOUNCEMENT that President Kennedy would make a brief trip to
Texas in November..."
(P. 172 )

Posner did have the assassination date right in his tome. but not
much else.

The "changed motorcade route" is a factoid ! And the selection of the
Trade Mart for the luncheon would have been known long before November
of 1963 and before LHO was planted in the Texas School Book
Depository. There were only two possible choices in addition to the
Trade Mart: Market Hall, which is across the street from the Trade
Mart and the Women’s Building at the State Fair Grounds.

The Market Hall was ideal insofar as security measures were concerned,
in that there were only three outside entrances, and it was a huge
hall, 107,000 square feet, with no columns, and you could seat about
20,000 people in there. But there was another function going to be
there at that time—the American Bottling Association was going to have
an exhibit there. So that part was out.

DNC advance man Jerry Bruno wrote: “If Kennedy was going [to the
Women’s Building, instead of the Trade Mart, he would have been
traveling two blocks farther away from the School Book Depository—and
at a much faster rate of speed. At that speed and distance, it would
have been almost impossible for a sniper to hit him from the
Depository.”90 The author would also add that a shot from the knoll
would have been more difficult, as well.

" We then went to Fair Park, where we made a survey of the Women’s
Building. It is a place where they have exhibits during the fair of
all kinds of handiwork and things like that. That building had about
45,000 square feet in it, and you could seat about 5,000 people in it.
Security wise it wasn't bad at all, because there were two end
openings to the building, and there was actually an area where you
could drive a car in there. But the building was not satisfactory for
that type of function—the President of the United States coming there—
because the ceilings were quite low, the air-conditioning equipment
and everything was all exposed, there were many steel suspension
supports throughout the area. I then returned to my office and
telephoned to Mr. Ben [on November 4, 1963] and informed him of my
findings and told him that security wise the Women's Building appeared
to be preferable, but that it wasn't a very nice place to take the
President.” [Emphasis added.] In effect, Sorrels was swaying the early
decision toward the Trade Mart by this comment, despite the fact that
the Trade Mart had many more entrances, requiring a lot more manpower,
and several cat-walks, excellent perches for potential snipers."

---- --- The Trade Mart and the motorcade route CHAPTER 4
http://www.assassinationresearch.com/v4n1/v4n1chapter04.pdf

It never happened. Evidence was wrenched out of context, and
misinterpreted. Ironically, anyone who had read the Warren Commission
Report would have known the truth. That volume discussed the parade
route extensively. It made it clear that you have to turn on Houston
and then Elm to get from Dallas' Main Street to the Stemmons Freeway.
If you try driving down Main, you can get to the Stemmons only by
driving over a concrete divider strip. That would be illegal, absurdly
undignified for the presidential limo, and impossible for the press
busses that were a part of the motorcade.

President Franklin D. Roosevelt had visited Dallas in 1936 and
traversed the same route in a motorcade (although in the opposite
direction).

President Kennedy's visit to Texas in November 1963 had been under
consideration for almost a year before it occurred and everyone agreed
that, if there was sufficient time, a motorcade through downtown
Dallas would be the best way for the people to see their
President. . . . According to Kenneth] O'Donnell, "we had a motorcade
wherever we went," particularly in large cities where the purpose was
to let the President be seen by as many people as possible. In his
experience, "it would be automatic" for the Secret Service to arrange
a route which would, within the time allotted, bring the President
"through an area which exposes him to the greatest number of people."

The motorcade route made absolutely no sense from a security
standpoint. The president had been driving past block after block
after block of sidewalks packed with onlookers. Why would those in
charge have violated so many of our established pre-cautionary
measures just to get him closer to a few dozen more people?”

For his part, Governor John Connally stated that he was never informed
about the exact route to be used on November 22, 1963.

Governor Connally testified that Main Street had been the usual route
for ceremonial occasions.

HSCA attorney Belford Lawson wanted to know the “reasons for the
selection of a route that was conspicuously less secure than other
simpler routes that were under consideration.”

“George L. Lumpkin, assistant police chief in Dallas in 1963, was
consulted by the Secret Service about the motorcade aspect of security
planning. Lumpkin explained that the alternative route, continuing
straight on Main through and beyond Dealey Plaza and thereby reaching
the Trade Mart on Industrial Boulevard, was rejected because the
neighborhood surrounding Industrial Boulevard was ‘filled with winos
and broken pavement’. Additionally, Lumpkin stated that Kennedy wanted
exposure and that there would have been no crowd on Industrial
Boulevard.”

The Dallas Police indicated that they would police any route the
Secret Service selected. In addition, Agent Paul Landis even wrote
about such “adverse” conditions encountered during the motorcade route
that was used in Dallas: “The outskirts seemed to consist mostly of
used car lots, junk dealers, auto parts stores, and this typical type
of neighborhood.”

SEE Sources:
http://www.assassinationresearch.com/v4n1/v4n1chapter04.pdf
Raymond
2012-01-22 15:52:26 UTC
Permalink
     The basic decision to visit Texas was made by the President, the
Vice-President Lyndon Johnson and John B. Connally Jr. The Governor of
Texas on JUNE 5, 1963, at the Cortez Hotel in El Paso, Texas.
(p.28 WR)
                                       Dallas Before the Visit
     " The two Dallas newspapers provided their readers with a steady
stream  of information and speculation about the trip, beginning on
September 13, when the Times-Herald announced in a front page article
that President Kennedy was planning a brief 1-day tour of four cities-
Dallas, Fort Worth, San Antonio, and Houston. Both Dallas papers cited
White House sources on September 26 as confirming the President's
intention to visit Texas on November 21 and 22, with Dallas scheduled
as one of the stops. (p. 40 WR )
   Even though an APRIL article (CE 1972) was the first public
announcement for a fall visit, explicit details were not resolved. The
Commission believed that it would be unreasonable to believe that the
eventual events of Nov. 22 could have been planned as early as April
since the location of the luncheon was not decided until Nov. 14. It
would have been impossible for Oswald, or any other conspirators to
plan the ambush on Dealey Plaza. The Commission concluded that Lee's
job at the TSBD was a coincidence and his recent employment (Oct 16 )
in the building had nothing to do with the assassination.
The Secret Service examined three potential sights for the
luncheon:One building, Market Hall was not available for Nov. 22; the
second, the Woman's Building, at the State Fair Grounds was not
selected because it lacked food handling facilities and had
otherdisadvantages. The Trade Mart was decided on and the parade route
was selected and agreed on November 14.
  The luncheon site was not an issue in the final results because the
Trade Mart and Market Hall were in the same section of Dallas. The
motorcade route would not have changed if Market Hall had been the
choice.
  On NOV. 8, the decision was made to allot 45 minutes to the parade
from Love Field to the luncheon site. The route selected measured 10
miles and could be covered in the 45 minutes. From the Trade Mart,
back to the airport, was only four miles, by the most direct route.
The route selected impressed the agents as a natural and desirable
one. Franklin Roosevelt had used almost the same route in 1936. It had
wide streets and guaranteed that the largest crowds would be afforded
the opportunity to see the President."  WR
  There were charges that the route was changed to take the President
past the TSBD . This is absurd. Anyone living in Dallas knows that the
only direct access to the Trade Mart or Market Hall was via Houston
Street from Main Street.
  Guaranteed, if the luncheon was going to be held on the runway of
Love Field, there would have been a parade down Main Street and in
front of the TSBD at 12;30 pm on November 22, 1963.
  Even the final authority on the assassination, Gerald Posner, got it
all wrong. He said that " While Oswald was on a twenty hour bus ride
that consumed all of September 26, a White House spokesman made the
FIRST ANNOUNCEMENT that President Kennedy would make a brief trip to
Texas in November..."
 (P. 172 )
  Posner did have the assassination date right in his tome. but not
much else.
The "changed motorcade route" is a factoid !  And the selection of the
Trade Mart for the luncheon would have been known long before November
of 1963 and before LHO was planted in the Texas School Book
Depository. There were only two possible choices in addition to the
Trade Mart:  Market Hall, which is across the street from the Trade
Mart and the Women’s Building at the State Fair Grounds.
The Market Hall was ideal insofar as security measures were concerned,
in that there were only three outside entrances, and it was a huge
hall, 107,000 square feet, with no columns, and you could seat about
20,000 people in there. But there was another function going to be
there at that time—the American Bottling Association was going to have
an exhibit there. So that part was out.
DNC advance man Jerry Bruno wrote: “If Kennedy was going [to the
Women’s Building,  instead of the Trade Mart, he would have been
traveling two blocks farther away from the School Book Depository—and
at a much faster rate of speed. At that speed and distance, it would
have been almost impossible for a sniper to hit him from the
Depository.”90 The author would also add that a shot from the knoll
would have been more difficult, as well.
" We then went to Fair Park, where we made a survey of the Women’s
Building. It is a place where they have exhibits during the fair of
all kinds of handiwork and things like that. That building had about
45,000 square feet in it, and you could seat about 5,000 people in it.
Security wise it wasn't bad at all, because there were two end
openings to the building, and there was actually an area where you
could drive a car in there. But the building was not satisfactory for
that type of function—the President of the United States coming there—
because the ceilings were quite low, the air-conditioning equipment
and everything was all exposed, there were many steel suspension
supports throughout the area. I then returned to my office and
telephoned to Mr. Ben [on November 4, 1963] and informed him of my
findings and told him that security wise the Women's Building appeared
to be preferable, but that it wasn't a very nice place to take the
President.” [Emphasis added.] In effect, Sorrels was swaying the early
decision toward the Trade Mart by this comment, despite the fact that
the Trade Mart had many more entrances, requiring a lot more manpower,
and several cat-walks, excellent perches for potential snipers."
----  ---  The Trade Mart and the motorcade route  CHAPTER 4http://www.assassinationresearch.com/v4n1/v4n1chapter04.pdf
 It never happened. Evidence was wrenched out of context, and
misinterpreted. Ironically, anyone who had read the Warren Commission
Report would have known the truth. That volume discussed the parade
route extensively. It made it clear that you have to turn on Houston
and then Elm to get from Dallas' Main Street to the Stemmons Freeway.
If you try driving down Main, you can get to the Stemmons only by
driving over a concrete divider strip. That would be illegal, absurdly
undignified for the presidential limo, and impossible for the press
busses that were a part of the motorcade.
President Franklin D. Roosevelt had visited Dallas in 1936 and
traversed the same route in a motorcade (although in the opposite
direction).
President Kennedy's visit to Texas in November 1963 had been under
consideration for almost a year before it occurred and everyone agreed
that, if there was sufficient time, a motorcade through downtown
Dallas would be the best way for the people to see their
President. . . . According to Kenneth] O'Donnell, "we had a motorcade
wherever we went," particularly in large cities where the purpose was
to let the President be seen by as many people as possible. In his
experience, "it would be automatic" for the Secret Service to arrange
a route which would, within the time allotted, bring the President
"through an area which exposes him to the greatest number of people."
The motorcade route made absolutely no sense from a security
standpoint. The president had been driving past block after block
after block of sidewalks packed with onlookers. Why would those in
charge have violated so many of our established pre-cautionary
measures just to get him closer to a few dozen more people?”
For his part, Governor John Connally stated that he was never informed
about the exact route to be used on November 22, 1963.
Governor Connally testified that Main Street had been the usual route
for ceremonial occasions.
HSCA attorney Belford Lawson wanted to know the “reasons for the
selection of a route that was conspicuously less secure than other
simpler routes that were under consideration.”
“George L. Lumpkin, assistant police chief in Dallas in 1963, was
consulted by the Secret Service about the motorcade aspect of security
planning. Lumpkin explained that the alternative route, continuing
straight on Main through and beyond Dealey Plaza and thereby reaching
the Trade Mart on Industrial Boulevard, was rejected because the
neighborhood surrounding Industrial Boulevard was ‘filled with winos
and broken pavement’. Additionally, Lumpkin stated that Kennedy wanted
exposure and that there would have been no crowd on Industrial
Boulevard.”
The Dallas Police indicated that they would police any route the
about such “adverse” conditions encountered during the motorcade route
that was used in Dallas: “The outskirts seemed to consist mostly of
used car lots, junk dealers, auto parts stores, and this typical type
of neighborhood.”
SEE  Sources:http://www.assassinationresearch.com/v4n1/v4n1chapter04.pdf
THE TEXAS SCHOOL BOOK DEPOSITORY: The PERFECT location and structure
to use for an ambush to murder JFK
Near the end of the motorcade with thinning crowds. The president's
hearse had to slow down to make the turn from Houston Street to get to
the Stemmon's Freway and to the Trade Mart... Only gullible people
will believe that Oswald's job in the TSBD was the result of the
caffine klatch, a casual social gathering for coffee and
conversation, at Mrs. Ed Rober's house. Coincidence my ass.! The
rolled over Ruth had her orders and performed like a champion . Let's
hope that Ruth or her timid ex husband will leave us with words of the
truth about their baby sitting project and how Ruthie was able to
swing the alleged assassin into a job in the most ideal buiding in
downtown Dallas to change American history to the extreme far right.

Ruth Paine testified that she was having coffee with four young
mothers when she remarked that LEE OSWALD needed a job:

Jenner: Now there came an occasion, did there not, that weekend or the
following weekend at which there was a discussion at least by you with
some neighbors with respect to efforts to obtain employment for
OSWALD?

Paine: As best as I can reconstruct it was while having coffee at my
immediate neighbors, Mrs. Ed Roberts, and also present was Mrs. Bill
Randle, and LEE had said over the weekend that he had gotten the last
of unemployment compensation checks that were due him and that it had
been smaller than the others had been, and disappointing in its
smallness and he looked very discouraged when he went to look for
work...And the subject that he was looking for work, and that he
hadn't found work for a week, came up while we were having coffee,
four young mothers at Mrs. Robert's house, and Mrs. Randle mentioned
that her younger brother, Wesley Frazier thought they needed another
person at the Texas School Book Depository where Wesley worked. Marina
then asked me, after we had gone home, asked me if I would call the
Texas School Book Depository to see if indeed there was the
possibility of an opening and at her request I did telephone...I
looked up the number in the book, and dialed it, was told I would need
to speak to Mr. Truely who was at the warehouse. The call was
transferred to Mr. Truely and I said I know of a young man whose wife
was staying in my house, the wife was expecting a child, they already
had a little girl, and he had been out of work for a while and was
very interested in getting any employment and his name, and was there
a possibility of an opening there, and Mr. Truly said he didn't know
whether he had an opening, that the young man should apply himself in
person. This was on Monday, October 14, 1963.

Ruth Paine had been instructed to find OSWALD a job in downtown
Dallas. She was not told that it was supposed to be in building that
was likely to over look the route of the a Presidential motorcade.
Ruth Paine knew that Buell Wesley Frazier, the younger brother of
Linnie Mae Randle, was employed at the Texas School Book Depository.
Temporary stock-boy jobs were always open there, and so it came as no
surprise to Ruth Paine when Linnie Mae Randle suggested that LEE
OSWALD try the Texas School Book Depository, after Paine brought up
the subject of OSWALD and a job.

Gerald Posner claimed that OSWALD'S placement in the Texas School Book
Depository was pure coincidence since Roy S. Truly (the superintendent
of the Texas School Book Depository who died in 1988), Linnie Mae
Randle, Ruth Paine, and a dozen others, would have had to have been
part of the conspiracy. Ruth Paine could have placed him there alone.

On Monday, October 14, 1963, Ruth Paine called Roy Truly and secured a
position for OSWALD. Marina Oswald told the HSCA: "She went to all the
trouble to get the job for him." Michael Paine was asked, "Was it mere
coincidence that your wife placed OSWALD in Dealey Plaza?" He
responded, "That is so simple that it should not be a part of this. He
lost his job at the photo lab and you've heard the story - and it's
true. Ruth was discussing it over coffee with some neighbors and they
thought there was a job opening at the Texas School Book Depository."
He was asked, “Did she know this neighbor's son worked at the Texas
School Book Depository?" He responded,

That is how come she knew. I think he had a job there, and he spread
the news in that household that they might be still be looking for
other employees. So Ruth took the number down that he should call and
told it to OSWALD. He called and was interviewed. We were trying to
get him a job to help him out. Ruth had no idea where it was. We
thought it was somewhere other than Dealey Plaza. There was absolutely
no input from the CIA to get him a job there. It was Ruth's idea.
There might have been a conspiracy, but that was not a part of it. And
we know we had no CIA connection, we didn't know the Texas School Book
Depository was there. We didn't know that President Kennedy was going
to come by. We had absolutely no part of it. If there was any
conspiracy, it could only have been that they knew OSWALD was a
Communist, and would pick on him. Hosty came around, he knew where
OSWALD was working. We had no CIA contact.---

----- NODULE X22 OCTOBER 1963 TO NOVEMBER 22, 1963
http://ajweberman.com/noduleX22-OCTOBER%201963%20TO%20NOVEMBER%2022,%201963.htm
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