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CLOSE CALL Rifleman Takes Shot at Walker : Dallas Morning News
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Raymond
2011-12-29 04:36:47 UTC
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The Dallas Morning News reported:

CLOSE CALL

Rifleman Takes Shot at Walker

by Eddie Hughes

A gunman with a high powered rifle tried to kill former Major General
Edwin Walker at his home Wednesday night, police said, and missed the
controversial crusader by less than an inch. Walker was working on his
income tax at 9:30 p.m. when the bullet, identified as a 30.06 crashed
through a rear window and slammed though a wall next to him. Police
said a slight movement by Walker apparently saved his life. 'Some one
had a perfect bead on him,'said Detective Ira Van Cleave, 'Whoever it
was certainly wanted to kill him.'

"Walker dug out several fragments of the shell's jacket from his right
sleeve and was still shaking glass and slivers of the bullet out of
his hair when reporters arrived. Walker said he returned to his Dallas
home Monday after an extensive coast-to-coast crusade which he called
'Midnight Alert.' It was on Monday night that one of his assistants
noticed a late modeled unlicenced car parked without lights in the
alley behind the Walker house at 4011 Turtle Creek. The car remained
there for about 30 minutes while several occupants once walked up to
the back door to look in, then left. Asked if he had any idea who shot
at him, Walker replied: 'There are plenty of people on the other side.
You don't have to go overseas to earn a Purple Heart. I've been saying
the front was right here at home. When I saw the hole in the wall I
went upstairs and got my gun, then went outside to take a look. I
didn't see anybody so I went back in the house and notified police."

TELEPHONE INTERVIEW WITH WALKER

In May 1977 I questioned General Edwin Walker: "I don't think the
Warren Commission would have found out if it was OSWALD unless they
had to and were sure of that. He did not deliberately miss. He was
dead on me with a telescopic sight. I didn't move. He hit the window
framework and the bullet was deflected. There were two people in the
alley and they were seen by a kid out in the alley 15 years old that
was carpentering with his daddy and he told the police there were two
men in the alley...there were two cars. The kid saw them sitting in
the church parking lot, the two men got in the cars and drove away. I
never heard of OSWALD or knew he was at a DRE meeting."

THE TRAJECTORY

In 1970 General Edwin Walker recalled, "In my home window today there
is a perfect bullet hole through a copper strip." [ltr. Walker/Russell
3.11.70] Dallas Police photographs revealed the bullet nicked the
window frame. The trajectory of the high powered bullet would have
been changed as a result of this. No tests were ever conducted by the
Warren Commission on General Edwin Walker's windows, so it was
difficult to determine precisely what role they played. Double click
here to see a photo of Walker's window. [Walker.JPEG] The bullet
whizzed by General Edwin Walker's arm (he said he had been hit in the
right arm by wood, glass or bullet fragments), passed through a wall,
then landed on a stack of packages of papers in an adjoining room. The
gunman rested his rifle on a wooden fence, slightly chipping it in the
process, and had a clear downhill shot at General Edwin Walker.
General Edwin Walker could have been easily killed, but only one shot
was fired.

HOSTY ASSIGNED THE WALKER CASE

On June 6, 1963, S.A. Hosty was informed by an ex-employee of General
Walker, William MacEwan Duff, that he was involved in an arrangement
to kill General Edwin Walker, with two other men. William MacEwan Duff
had received an Undesirable Discharge from the Army on June 2, 1964,
by reason of unfitness due to Fraudulent Entry in the Army
(concealment of other service). His record contained a letter
entitled: "Fraudulent Entry" that stated: "During the entire period of
time EM has been assigned he continually cause trouble because of his
refusal to tell the truth." Duff came to Dallas where he married
Frances Barnard. The marriage was annulled after two weeks.

In June 1963 two private investigators hired by General Edwin Walker
told the Dallas Police Department that Duff was planning to kill
Walker. These were the two men named by Duff as plotting to kill
Walker. Duff was arrested and polygraphed. The polygraph test
indicated he had no knowledge of the Walker Incident.

OSWALD WAS UNSURE OF THE OUTCOME OF WALKER INCIDENT

The FBI reported: "Dallas report of S.A. WARREN C. DeBRUEYS dated
December 8, 1963, on pages 284 and 285 set out interviews of Marina
Oswald on December 3, 1963, and December 4, 1963. She advised during
the Spring of 1963 they resided on Neeley Street. One evening in the
Spring of 1963 her husband indicated he was going to typing class at
the Dallas evening school (Crozier Technical High School where OSWALD
last attended on April 8, 1963) where he normally attended two or
three times a week. On this particular evening he was very late and
arrived home about midnight, very pale, agitated and excited at which
time he admitted trying to kill General Walker by shooting at Walker
with a rifle. Marina Oswald stated her husband normally would depart
the Neeley Street address sometime between 6:00 p.m. and 7:00 p.m.
returning home about 9:00 p.m."

In 1964 Marina told the Bureau: "When he came back, I asked him what
happened. He was very pale. I don't remember the exact time, but it
was very late. And he told me not to ask him any questions. He only
told me he had shot at General Edwin Walker." OSWALD went on that he
did not know if he had hit General Edwin Walker; when he learned from
the newspapers the next day that he had missed, he told her he was
"sorry that he had not hit him." Marina Oswald told the HSCA: "[When
he returned late that evening] he turned the radio on and he was very
pale and he was listening to the news, changing from station to
station. I ask him what it was all about, and he said that he tried to
shoot General Edwin Walker. I told him, how dare you take somebody's
life and you should not do things like that, I mean you have no right
to do it. He said well if somebody shot Hitler at the right time you
will do justice to humanity so since I do not know anything about the
man I should not talk about it." [Marina's HSCA Test. pg. 383] In 1994
Marina Oswald told this researcher: "All I can tell you is what he
told me when he came home. And people have pointed out how nervous he
was after that, and he was cool as cucumber after Kennedy? Are you
asking me, did I make this up? No. He came home from work, it was
late, I found the note in one of the little closets. I confront him
when he came what it was all about? Then he turned the radio on. He
told me he shot at Walker."

ANALYSIS

If OSWALD shot at General Edwin Walker he would have known immediately
if he hit him or missed him. Marina Oswald pointed out to this
interviewer that all she had was her husband's word he shot at General
Edwin Walker. She was not a witness to the event. HEMMING was the
shooter and knew the outcome of the Walker incident. OSWALD was
exaggerating his importance in the event to his wife. He had not done
the shooting. If he had, he would have known that he missed.

EVIDENCE FABRICATED BY DEMOHRENSCHILDT

DeMohrenschildt told the Warren Commission that while he and his wife
were visiting the OSWALDS one evening at Neely Street, Marina Oswald
remarked that LEE bought a gun and showed it to Mrs. DeMohrenschildt.
George DeMohrenschildt told the FBI that this visit occurred on
Saturday, April 13, 1963. That year Easter Sunday fell on April 14,
1963. The purpose of the visit was to deliver an Easter present to
OSWALD'S daughter. In 1964 Marina Oswald stated "when she had asked
her husband what he had done with the rifle, he replied that he had
buried it in the ground or had hidden it in some bushes. He also
mentioned a railroad track in this connection. She testified that
several days later, OSWALD recovered his rifle, and brought it back to
the apartment." Marina Oswald stated that OSWALD did not retrieve his
rifle until April 14, 1963.

Nonetheless, George DeMohrenschildt claimed he and OSWALD stood in the
front room talking, and Marina Oswald opened a closet to show Mrs.
DeMohrenschildt the gun; Mrs. DeMohrenschildt called out to her
husband in the next room. He did not get a look at it, but remembered
a telescopic sight. Marina Oswald told them LEE used it for target
shooting. George DeMohrenschildt noted he then "jokingly" asked LEE if
he had taken the shot at General Edwin Walker. LEE became tense, "sort
of shriveled," and made a face in answer to the question without
specifically answering it.

In a State Department interview at the American Embassy, Haiti, on
December 1963 the DeMohrenschildts claimed they had seen the rifle in
the Fall of 1962, and not the following Spring. In that interview,
they claimed the last time they had seen the OSWALDS was in January
1963, not April 1963; they were too busy preparing for their
forthcoming trip to Haiti to see LEE and Marina Oswald after that.
[HSCA V12 p52] The HSCA asked Marina Oswald whether she exhibited the
rifle to the DeMohrenschildts: "I cannot tell you that, not because I
am hiding, but because I cannot recall." [HSCA V12 p301]

In George DeMohrenschildt's unpublished manuscript, he blamed the
Walker incident on a Jew: "There is another thing which makes me
believe that LEE possibly tried to shoot General Edwin Walker. A man,
whose name I do not recall, a Jewish man, whom LEE met at Ford's
Christmas party, described General Edwin Walker as the most dangerous
man in the United States, a potential neo-fascilst [sic] leader. I
noticed that LEE kept on asking why. And the other fellow explained
clearly his reasons. LEE might have been influenced by this
statement." Marina Oswald told this interviewer in 1994: "I think he
waited two days before recovering the rifle. They did come and bring
that. If it was Easter it had to be Sunday. I liked DeMohrenschildt
very much."

EVIDENCE - THE NOTE

OSWALD left a note for Marina Oswald in Russian with practical
instructions in case the Walker mission ended in failure. Marina
Oswald testified she became agitated the night of the Walker incident
when she found the note in OSWALD'S room; she entered the room
contrary to his instructions when she began to worry about his
absence. She allegedly kept the note, to turn over to the authorities
"if something like that should be repeated again." When asked whether
LEE requested she return the note, she claimed: "He forgot about it."
Marina Oswald did not bring the note to the attention of the Dallas
Police Department, but kept the note in a Russian book entitled Useful
Advice. Ruth Paine accidentally turned the note over to the Dallas
Police Department on December 2, 1963. Michael Paine: "I accept that
he took a shot at Walker and nothing came of it. I think he probably
meant to kill him, but Walker had the good fortune to duck at the
right moment. He wrote a letter and left it with Marina Oswald just
before he went out that night. My wife was raked over the coals by the
FBI when she quite unwittingly sent that letter to Marina Oswald. Ruth
was sending Marina things she thought Marina would like, and this was
a book written by Doctor Spock on babies. The FBI came back thinking
she was trying to smuggle important information to Marina. So they
grilled her, brought her to tears, and she was totally ignorant of
that letter being in the book. She had never seen it. And she was very
angry at Marina for keeping from her that LEE had done that. Later on,
I remember discussing with Ruth why she had done that: Marina Oswald
was afraid of being deported back to Russia." Ruth Paine: "This was a
book that Marina had read to me from. It was child raising manual.
After she left on November 23, 1963, I expected her to come back, but
she didn't. So every day or so I would send something the baby that
might need - a change of clothing, etc. Mail began to come for her. I
would give it to the police. The FBI had overlooked it. Later, I
understood Marina had hidden a note in a book. First I heard about it,
two guys from the Secret Service came and asked if I knew anything
about it. They presented it as if I did know something about it. I
said, 'I just sent a book to her.'" The text of the note:

(1) This is the key to the mailbox which is located in the main post
office in the city on Ervay Street. This is the same street where the
drugstore, in which you always waited is located. You will find the
mailbox in the post office which is located 4 blocks from the
drugstore on that street. I paid for the box last month so don't worry
about it.

(2) Send the information as to what has happened to me to the Embassy
and include newspaper clippings (should there be anything about me in
the newspapers). I believe that the Embassy will come quickly to your
assistance upon learning everything.

(3) I paid the house rent on the second so don't worry about it.

(4) Recently I also paid for water and gas.

(5) The money from work will possibly be coming. The money will be
sent to our post office box. Go to the bank and cash the check.

(6) You can either throw out or give my clothing etc. away Do not keep
these. However I prefer you hold on to my personal papers (military,
civil etc.)

(7) Certain of my documents are in the small blue valise.

(8) The address book can be found on my table in the study should you
need same.

(9) We have friends here. The Red Cross also will help you. (Red Cross
in English). [sic]

(10) I left you as much money as I could, $60 on the second of the
month. You and the baby (apparently) can live for another two months
using $10 per week.

(11) If I am alive and taken prisoner, the city jail is located at the
end of the bridge though which we always passed on going to the city
(right in the beginning of the city after crossing the bridge).

ANALYSIS

The note referred to the Walker Incident.

1. "This is the key to the mailbox which is located in the main post
office in the city on Ervay Street. This is the same street where the
drugstore, in which you always waited is located. You will find the
mailbox in the post office which is located 4 blocks from the
drugstore on that street. I paid for the box last month so don't worry
about it."

OSWALD gave Marina Oswald the key to his post office box for the first
time. He had previously withheld it from her. OSWALD had Marina Oswald
wait in a drugstore rather than accompany him into the main post
office on Ervay Street, where OSWALD rented Box 2915 from October 9,
1962, to May 14, 1963. What was he up to at the Post Office?

The Warren Commission: "Although the possibilities of investigation in
this area are limited, there is no evidence that any of [OSWALD'S
three boxes] were ever used for the surreptitious receipt of
messages...The single outstanding key was recovered from OSWALD
immediately after he was taken in custody." [WR p312] In 1994 Marina
Oswald did not recall having been told to wait in the drugstore while
her husband went to the post office: "It was just to remind me where
it was."

2. "Send the information as to what has happened to me to the Embassy
and include newspaper clippings (should there be anything about me in
the newspapers). I believe that the Embassy will come quickly to your
assistance upon learning everything."

OSWALD feared his action might escape notice not only by the
Washington newspapers, where the Soviet Embassy was located, but by
the local media in Dallas. General Edwin Walker was headline news in
1963; even the anonymous pot shot made the front page of the Dallas
Morning News. OSWALD was incredibly stupid.

OSWALD was about to commit a political act which would be viewed
sympathetically by the Soviets. According to Marina Oswald: "LEE said
he was a very bad man, that he was a fascist, that he was the leader
of a fascist organization...if someone had killed Hitler in time it
would have saved many lives." [WR p406]

3. "I paid the house rent on the second so don't worry about it.
Recently I also paid for water and gas. The money from work will
possibly be coming. The money will be sent to our post office box. Go
to the bank and cash the check." The reference to OSWALD'S check
having been mailed to his Post Office Box meant the letter was written
sometime after April 5, 1963, when he lost his job at Jagger-Chiles-
Stoval.

4. "You can either throw out or give my clothing etc. away Do not keep
these. However I prefer you hold on to my personal papers (military,
civil etc.) Certain of my documents are in the small blue valise. The
address book can be found on my table in the study should you need
same." OSWALD was about to commit a crime that could result in a stiff
prison sentence.

5. "We have friends here. The Red Cross also will help you. (Red Cross
in English). [sic] I left you as much money as I could, $60 on the
second of the month. You and the baby (apparently) can live for
another two months using $10 per week. If I am alive and taken
prisoner, the city jail is located at the end of the bridge though
which we always passed on going to the city (right in the beginning of
the city after crossing the bridge)." OSWALD was going after a former
General , a tough customer. He could have been killed or taken
prisoner. [DeMohrenschildt/W WR p282; WR pp. 416, 738, 592; HSCA R pp.
98, 60, 62]

Marina Oswald told this researcher 1994: "If he was apprehended as you
said, but something more will be printed, then identify people who
tried to shoot at Walker as it was in newspapers, you follow me? Maybe
the Embassy would help me to go back to Russia? He was giving
instructions where to go if he doesn't come home. Maybe he was with a
group and maybe they would kill him. It's unlikely Walker would have
killed him. The police aren't going to kill him. The message of the
thing was that he had a mission or had another second life. He did not
indulge in a explanation to me. I knew nothing about it. So, if
something happened to me, he was just giving directions to go to get
help. Maybe somehow also he betrays himself by saying it. That's a
giveaway without him realizing that. The note did not say he was going
to kill Walker. He came home without that rifle. What was all that
about? If HEMMING put my husband up to this, the main thing was to
show LEE was a killer."

BULLET PROBABLY FIRED FROM A MANNLICHER-CARCANO
Cont'd
http://mcadams.posc.mu.edu/weberman/nodule10.htm
Walt
2011-12-29 18:54:19 UTC
Permalink
Post by Raymond
CLOSE CALL
Rifleman Takes Shot at Walker
by Eddie Hughes
A gunman with a high powered rifle tried to kill former Major General
Edwin Walker at his home Wednesday night, police said, and missed the
controversial crusader by less than an inch. Walker was working on his
income tax at 9:30 p.m. when the bullet, identified as a 30.06 crashed
through a rear window and slammed though a wall next to him. Police
said a slight movement by Walker apparently saved his life. 'Some one
had a perfect bead on him,'said Detective Ira Van Cleave, 'Whoever it
was certainly wanted to kill him.'
"Walker dug out several fragments of the shell's jacket from his right
sleeve and was still shaking glass and slivers of the bullet out of
his hair when reporters arrived.
"Walker dug out several fragments of the shell's jacket from his right
sleeve and was still shaking glass and slivers of the bullet out of his
hair when reporters arrived."


Hmmmmmm...... Verrrrry interrrresting! Please note that this story
differs slightly from the story the Warren Commission placed on the
record. It differs in the fact that Walker was not injured. This story
says that Walker removed fragments of the bullets jacket from his
SLEEVE..... and glass and slivers of the bullet from his hair when
reporters arrived.

The Warren Commission lead us to believe that Walker was injured (and some
fools still believe it) Those same fools are too stupid to see that the
Walker incident was nothing but a staged publicity stunt to garner
attention for Walker.



Walker said he returned to his Dallas
Post by Raymond
home Monday after an extensive coast-to-coast crusade which he called
'Midnight Alert.' It was on Monday night that one of his assistants
noticed a late modeled unlicenced car parked without lights in the
alley behind the Walker house at 4011 Turtle Creek. The car remained
there for about 30 minutes while several occupants once walked up to
the back door to look in, then left. Asked if he had any idea who shot
at him, Walker replied: 'There are plenty of people on the other side.
You don't have to go overseas to earn a Purple Heart. I've been saying
the front was right here at home. When I saw the hole in the wall I
went upstairs and got my gun, then went outside to take a look. I
didn't see anybody so I went back in the house and notified police."
TELEPHONE INTERVIEW WITH WALKER
In May 1977 I questioned General Edwin Walker: "I don't think the
Warren Commission would have found out if it was OSWALD unless they
had to and were sure of that. He did not deliberately miss. He was
dead on me with a telescopic sight. I didn't move. He hit the window
framework and the bullet was deflected. There were two people in the
alley and they were seen by a kid out in the alley 15 years old that
was carpentering with his daddy and he told the police there were two
men in the alley...there were two cars. The kid saw them sitting in
the church parking lot, the two men got in the cars and drove away. I
never heard of OSWALD or knew he was at a DRE meeting."
THE TRAJECTORY
In 1970 General Edwin Walker recalled, "In my home window today there
is a perfect bullet hole through a copper strip." [ltr. Walker/Russell
3.11.70]  Dallas Police photographs revealed the bullet nicked the
window frame. The trajectory of the high powered bullet would have
been changed as a result of this. No tests were ever conducted by the
Warren Commission on General Edwin Walker's windows, so it was
difficult to determine precisely what role they played. Double click
here to see a photo of Walker's window. [Walker.JPEG] The bullet
whizzed by General Edwin Walker's arm (he said he had been hit in the
right arm by wood, glass or bullet fragments), passed through a wall,
then landed on a stack of packages of papers in an adjoining room. The
gunman rested his rifle on a wooden fence, slightly chipping it in the
process, and had a clear downhill shot at General Edwin Walker.
General Edwin Walker could have been easily killed, but only one shot
was fired.
HOSTY ASSIGNED THE WALKER CASE
On June 6, 1963, S.A. Hosty was informed by an ex-employee of General
Walker, William MacEwan Duff, that he was involved in an arrangement
to kill General Edwin Walker, with two other men. William MacEwan Duff
had received an Undesirable Discharge from the Army on June 2, 1964,
by reason of unfitness due to Fraudulent Entry in the Army
(concealment of other service). His record contained a letter
entitled: "Fraudulent Entry" that stated: "During the entire period of
time EM has been assigned he continually cause trouble because of his
refusal to tell the truth." Duff came to Dallas where he married
Frances Barnard. The marriage was annulled after two weeks.
In June 1963 two private investigators hired by General Edwin Walker
told the Dallas Police Department that Duff was planning to kill
Walker. These were the two men named by Duff as plotting to kill
Walker. Duff was arrested and polygraphed. The polygraph test
indicated he had no knowledge of the Walker Incident.
OSWALD WAS UNSURE OF THE OUTCOME OF WALKER INCIDENT
The FBI reported: "Dallas report of S.A. WARREN C. DeBRUEYS dated
December 8, 1963, on pages 284 and 285 set out interviews of Marina
Oswald on December 3, 1963, and December 4, 1963. She advised during
the Spring of 1963 they resided on Neeley Street. One evening in the
Spring of 1963 her husband indicated he was going to typing class at
the Dallas evening school (Crozier Technical High School where OSWALD
last attended on April 8, 1963) where he normally attended two or
three times a week. On this particular evening he was very late and
arrived home about midnight, very pale, agitated and excited at which
time he admitted trying to kill General Walker by shooting at Walker
with a rifle. Marina Oswald stated her husband normally would depart
the Neeley Street address sometime between 6:00 p.m. and 7:00 p.m.
returning home about 9:00 p.m."
In 1964 Marina told the Bureau: "When he came back, I asked him what
happened. He was very pale. I don't remember the exact time, but it
was very late. And he told me not to ask him any questions. He only
told me he had shot at General Edwin Walker." OSWALD went on that he
did not know if he had hit General Edwin Walker; when he learned from
the newspapers the next day that he had missed, he told her he was
"sorry that he had not hit him." Marina Oswald told the HSCA: "[When
he returned late that evening] he turned the radio on and he was very
pale and he was listening to the news, changing from station to
station. I ask him what it was all about, and he said that he tried to
shoot General Edwin Walker. I told him, how dare you take somebody's
life and you should not do things like that, I mean you have no right
to do it. He said well if somebody shot Hitler at the right time you
will do justice to humanity so since I do not know anything about the
man I should not talk about it." [Marina's HSCA Test. pg. 383] In 1994
Marina Oswald told this researcher: "All I can tell you is what he
told me when he came home. And people have pointed out how nervous he
was after that, and he was cool as cucumber after Kennedy? Are you
asking me, did I make this up? No. He came home from work, it was
late, I found the note in one of the little closets. I confront him
when he came what it was all about? Then he turned the radio on. He
told me he shot at Walker."
ANALYSIS
If OSWALD shot at General Edwin Walker he would have known immediately
if he hit him or missed him. Marina Oswald pointed out to this
interviewer that all she had was her husband's word he shot at General
Edwin Walker. She was not a witness to the event. HEMMING was the
shooter and knew the outcome of the Walker incident. OSWALD was
exaggerating his importance in the event to his wife. He had not done
the shooting. If he had, he would have known that he missed.
EVIDENCE FABRICATED BY DEMOHRENSCHILDT
DeMohrenschildt told the Warren Commission that while he and his wife
were visiting the OSWALDS one evening at Neely Street, Marina Oswald
remarked that LEE bought a gun and showed it to Mrs. DeMohrenschildt.
George DeMohrenschildt told the FBI that this visit occurred on
Saturday, April 13, 1963. That year Easter Sunday fell on April 14,
1963. The purpose of the visit was to deliver an Easter present to
OSWALD'S daughter. In 1964 Marina Oswald stated "when she had asked
her husband what he had done with the rifle, he replied that he had
buried it in the ground or had hidden it in some bushes. He also
mentioned a railroad track in this connection. She testified that
several days later, OSWALD recovered his rifle, and brought it back to
the apartment." Marina Oswald stated that OSWALD did not retrieve his
rifle until April 14, 1963.
Nonetheless, George DeMohrenschildt claimed he and OSWALD stood in the
front room talking, and Marina Oswald opened a closet to show Mrs.
DeMohrenschildt the gun; Mrs. DeMohrenschildt called out to her
husband in the next room. He did not get a look at it, but remembered
a telescopic sight. Marina Oswald told them LEE used it for target
shooting. George DeMohrenschildt noted he then "jokingly" asked LEE if
he had taken the shot at General Edwin Walker. LEE became tense, "sort
of shriveled," and made a face in answer to the question without
specifically answering it.
In a State Department interview at the American Embassy, Haiti, on
December 1963 the DeMohrenschildts claimed they had seen the rifle in
the Fall of 1962, and not the following Spring. In that interview,
they claimed the last time they had seen the OSWALDS was in January
1963, not April 1963; they were too busy preparing for their
forthcoming trip to Haiti to see LEE and Marina Oswald after that.
[HSCA V12 p52] The HSCA asked Marina Oswald whether she exhibited the
rifle to the DeMohrenschildts: "I cannot tell you that, not because I
am hiding, but because I cannot recall." [HSCA V12 p301]
In George DeMohrenschildt's unpublished manuscript, he blamed the
Walker incident on a Jew: "There is another thing which makes me
believe that LEE possibly tried to shoot General Edwin Walker. A man,
whose name I do not recall, a Jewish man, whom LEE met at Ford's
Christmas party, described General Edwin Walker as the most dangerous
man in the United States, a potential neo-fascilst [sic] leader. I
noticed that LEE kept on asking why. And the other fellow explained
clearly his reasons. LEE might have been influenced by this
statement." Marina Oswald told this interviewer in 1994: "I think he
waited two days ...
read more »
timstter
2011-12-30 02:44:39 UTC
Permalink
TOP POST

There appears nothing there, apart from speculation, to indicate that
Hemming had anything to do with it.

What about the photos of Walker's house found among Oswald's
possessions after JFK was shot?

Marina's recall rings true, as they also found a photo of some railway
tracks near Walker's home, which was apparently near where Oswald
concealed the rifle.

Regards,

Tim Brennan
Sydney, Australia
*Newsgroup(s) Commentator*
Post by Raymond
CLOSE CALL
Rifleman Takes Shot at Walker
by Eddie Hughes
A gunman with a high powered rifle tried to kill former Major General
Edwin Walker at his home Wednesday night, police said, and missed the
controversial crusader by less than an inch. Walker was working on his
income tax at 9:30 p.m. when the bullet, identified as a 30.06 crashed
through a rear window and slammed though a wall next to him. Police
said a slight movement by Walker apparently saved his life. 'Some one
had a perfect bead on him,'said Detective Ira Van Cleave, 'Whoever it
was certainly wanted to kill him.'
"Walker dug out several fragments of the shell's jacket from his right
sleeve and was still shaking glass and slivers of the bullet out of
his hair when reporters arrived. Walker said he returned to his Dallas
home Monday after an extensive coast-to-coast crusade which he called
'Midnight Alert.' It was on Monday night that one of his assistants
noticed a late modeled unlicenced car parked without lights in the
alley behind the Walker house at 4011 Turtle Creek. The car remained
there for about 30 minutes while several occupants once walked up to
the back door to look in, then left. Asked if he had any idea who shot
at him, Walker replied: 'There are plenty of people on the other side.
You don't have to go overseas to earn a Purple Heart. I've been saying
the front was right here at home. When I saw the hole in the wall I
went upstairs and got my gun, then went outside to take a look. I
didn't see anybody so I went back in the house and notified police."
TELEPHONE INTERVIEW WITH WALKER
In May 1977 I questioned General Edwin Walker: "I don't think the
Warren Commission would have found out if it was OSWALD unless they
had to and were sure of that. He did not deliberately miss. He was
dead on me with a telescopic sight. I didn't move. He hit the window
framework and the bullet was deflected. There were two people in the
alley and they were seen by a kid out in the alley 15 years old that
was carpentering with his daddy and he told the police there were two
men in the alley...there were two cars. The kid saw them sitting in
the church parking lot, the two men got in the cars and drove away. I
never heard of OSWALD or knew he was at a DRE meeting."
THE TRAJECTORY
In 1970 General Edwin Walker recalled, "In my home window today there
is a perfect bullet hole through a copper strip." [ltr. Walker/Russell
3.11.70]  Dallas Police photographs revealed the bullet nicked the
window frame. The trajectory of the high powered bullet would have
been changed as a result of this. No tests were ever conducted by the
Warren Commission on General Edwin Walker's windows, so it was
difficult to determine precisely what role they played. Double click
here to see a photo of Walker's window. [Walker.JPEG] The bullet
whizzed by General Edwin Walker's arm (he said he had been hit in the
right arm by wood, glass or bullet fragments), passed through a wall,
then landed on a stack of packages of papers in an adjoining room. The
gunman rested his rifle on a wooden fence, slightly chipping it in the
process, and had a clear downhill shot at General Edwin Walker.
General Edwin Walker could have been easily killed, but only one shot
was fired.
HOSTY ASSIGNED THE WALKER CASE
On June 6, 1963, S.A. Hosty was informed by an ex-employee of General
Walker, William MacEwan Duff, that he was involved in an arrangement
to kill General Edwin Walker, with two other men. William MacEwan Duff
had received an Undesirable Discharge from the Army on June 2, 1964,
by reason of unfitness due to Fraudulent Entry in the Army
(concealment of other service). His record contained a letter
entitled: "Fraudulent Entry" that stated: "During the entire period of
time EM has been assigned he continually cause trouble because of his
refusal to tell the truth." Duff came to Dallas where he married
Frances Barnard. The marriage was annulled after two weeks.
In June 1963 two private investigators hired by General Edwin Walker
told the Dallas Police Department that Duff was planning to kill
Walker. These were the two men named by Duff as plotting to kill
Walker. Duff was arrested and polygraphed. The polygraph test
indicated he had no knowledge of the Walker Incident.
OSWALD WAS UNSURE OF THE OUTCOME OF WALKER INCIDENT
The FBI reported: "Dallas report of S.A. WARREN C. DeBRUEYS dated
December 8, 1963, on pages 284 and 285 set out interviews of Marina
Oswald on December 3, 1963, and December 4, 1963. She advised during
the Spring of 1963 they resided on Neeley Street. One evening in the
Spring of 1963 her husband indicated he was going to typing class at
the Dallas evening school (Crozier Technical High School where OSWALD
last attended on April 8, 1963) where he normally attended two or
three times a week. On this particular evening he was very late and
arrived home about midnight, very pale, agitated and excited at which
time he admitted trying to kill General Walker by shooting at Walker
with a rifle. Marina Oswald stated her husband normally would depart
the Neeley Street address sometime between 6:00 p.m. and 7:00 p.m.
returning home about 9:00 p.m."
In 1964 Marina told the Bureau: "When he came back, I asked him what
happened. He was very pale. I don't remember the exact time, but it
was very late. And he told me not to ask him any questions. He only
told me he had shot at General Edwin Walker." OSWALD went on that he
did not know if he had hit General Edwin Walker; when he learned from
the newspapers the next day that he had missed, he told her he was
"sorry that he had not hit him." Marina Oswald told the HSCA: "[When
he returned late that evening] he turned the radio on and he was very
pale and he was listening to the news, changing from station to
station. I ask him what it was all about, and he said that he tried to
shoot General Edwin Walker. I told him, how dare you take somebody's
life and you should not do things like that, I mean you have no right
to do it. He said well if somebody shot Hitler at the right time you
will do justice to humanity so since I do not know anything about the
man I should not talk about it." [Marina's HSCA Test. pg. 383] In 1994
Marina Oswald told this researcher: "All I can tell you is what he
told me when he came home. And people have pointed out how nervous he
was after that, and he was cool as cucumber after Kennedy? Are you
asking me, did I make this up? No. He came home from work, it was
late, I found the note in one of the little closets. I confront him
when he came what it was all about? Then he turned the radio on. He
told me he shot at Walker."
ANALYSIS
If OSWALD shot at General Edwin Walker he would have known immediately
if he hit him or missed him. Marina Oswald pointed out to this
interviewer that all she had was her husband's word he shot at General
Edwin Walker. She was not a witness to the event. HEMMING was the
shooter and knew the outcome of the Walker incident. OSWALD was
exaggerating his importance in the event to his wife. He had not done
the shooting. If he had, he would have known that he missed.
EVIDENCE FABRICATED BY DEMOHRENSCHILDT
DeMohrenschildt told the Warren Commission that while he and his wife
were visiting the OSWALDS one evening at Neely Street, Marina Oswald
remarked that LEE bought a gun and showed it to Mrs. DeMohrenschildt.
George DeMohrenschildt told the FBI that this visit occurred on
Saturday, April 13, 1963. That year Easter Sunday fell on April 14,
1963. The purpose of the visit was to deliver an Easter present to
OSWALD'S daughter. In 1964 Marina Oswald stated "when she had asked
her husband what he had done with the rifle, he replied that he had
buried it in the ground or had hidden it in some bushes. He also
mentioned a railroad track in this connection. She testified that
several days later, OSWALD recovered his rifle, and brought it back to
the apartment." Marina Oswald stated that OSWALD did not retrieve his
rifle until April 14, 1963.
Nonetheless, George DeMohrenschildt claimed he and OSWALD stood in the
front room talking, and Marina Oswald opened a closet to show Mrs.
DeMohrenschildt the gun; Mrs. DeMohrenschildt called out to her
husband in the next room. He did not get a look at it, but remembered
a telescopic sight. Marina Oswald told them LEE used it for target
shooting. George DeMohrenschildt noted he then "jokingly" asked LEE if
he had taken the shot at General Edwin Walker. LEE became tense, "sort
of shriveled," and made a face in answer to the question without
specifically answering it.
In a State Department interview at the American Embassy, Haiti, on
December 1963 the DeMohrenschildts claimed they had seen the rifle in
the Fall of 1962, and not the following Spring. In that interview,
they claimed the last time they had seen the OSWALDS was in January
1963, not April 1963; they were too busy preparing for their
forthcoming trip to Haiti to see LEE and Marina Oswald after that.
[HSCA V12 p52] The HSCA asked Marina Oswald whether she exhibited the
rifle to the DeMohrenschildts: "I cannot tell you that, not because I
am hiding, but because I cannot recall." [HSCA V12 p301]
In George DeMohrenschildt's unpublished manuscript, he blamed the
Walker incident on a Jew: "There is another thing which makes me
believe that LEE possibly tried to shoot General Edwin Walker. A man,
whose name I do not recall, a Jewish man, whom LEE met at Ford's
Christmas party, described General Edwin Walker as the most dangerous
man in the United States, a potential neo-fascilst [sic] leader. I
noticed that LEE kept on asking why. And the other fellow explained
clearly his reasons. LEE might have been influenced by this
statement." Marina Oswald told this interviewer in 1994: "I think he
waited two days ...
read more »
t***@cox.net
2011-12-31 02:33:18 UTC
Permalink
NEVER any citation from this guy ! ! !
Post by timstter
TOP POST
There appears nothing there, apart from speculation, to indicate that
Hemming had anything to do with it.
What about the photos of Walker's house found among Oswald's
possessions after JFK was shot?
Marina's recall rings true, as they also found a photo of some railway
tracks near Walker's home, which was apparently near where Oswald
concealed the rifle.
Regards,
Tim Brennan
Sydney, Australia
*Newsgroup(s) Commentator*
Post by Raymond
CLOSE CALL
Rifleman Takes Shot at Walker
by Eddie Hughes
A gunman with a high powered rifle tried to kill former Major General
Edwin Walker at his home Wednesday night, police said, and missed the
controversial crusader by less than an inch. Walker was working on his
income tax at 9:30 p.m. when the bullet, identified as a 30.06 crashed
through a rear window and slammed though a wall next to him. Police
said a slight movement by Walker apparently saved his life. 'Some one
had a perfect bead on him,'said Detective Ira Van Cleave, 'Whoever it
was certainly wanted to kill him.'
"Walker dug out several fragments of the shell's jacket from his right
sleeve and was still shaking glass and slivers of the bullet out of
his hair when reporters arrived. Walker said he returned to his Dallas
home Monday after an extensive coast-to-coast crusade which he called
'Midnight Alert.' It was on Monday night that one of his assistants
noticed a late modeled unlicenced car parked without lights in the
alley behind the Walker house at 4011 Turtle Creek. The car remained
there for about 30 minutes while several occupants once walked up to
the back door to look in, then left. Asked if he had any idea who shot
at him, Walker replied: 'There are plenty of people on the other side.
You don't have to go overseas to earn a Purple Heart. I've been saying
the front was right here at home. When I saw the hole in the wall I
went upstairs and got my gun, then went outside to take a look. I
didn't see anybody so I went back in the house and notified police."
TELEPHONE INTERVIEW WITH WALKER
In May 1977 I questioned General Edwin Walker: "I don't think the
Warren Commission would have found out if it was OSWALD unless they
had to and were sure of that. He did not deliberately miss. He was
dead on me with a telescopic sight. I didn't move. He hit the window
framework and the bullet was deflected. There were two people in the
alley and they were seen by a kid out in the alley 15 years old that
was carpentering with his daddy and he told the police there were two
men in the alley...there were two cars. The kid saw them sitting in
the church parking lot, the two men got in the cars and drove away. I
never heard of OSWALD or knew he was at a DRE meeting."
THE TRAJECTORY
In 1970 General Edwin Walker recalled, "In my home window today there
is a perfect bullet hole through a copper strip." [ltr. Walker/Russell
3.11.70] =A0Dallas Police photographs revealed the bullet nicked the
window frame. The trajectory of the high powered bullet would have
been changed as a result of this. No tests were ever conducted by the
Warren Commission on General Edwin Walker's windows, so it was
difficult to determine precisely what role they played. Double click
here to see a photo of Walker's window. [Walker.JPEG] The bullet
whizzed by General Edwin Walker's arm (he said he had been hit in the
right arm by wood, glass or bullet fragments), passed through a wall,
then landed on a stack of packages of papers in an adjoining room. The
gunman rested his rifle on a wooden fence, slightly chipping it in the
process, and had a clear downhill shot at General Edwin Walker.
General Edwin Walker could have been easily killed, but only one shot
was fired.
HOSTY ASSIGNED THE WALKER CASE
On June 6, 1963, S.A. Hosty was informed by an ex-employee of General
Walker, William MacEwan Duff, that he was involved in an arrangement
to kill General Edwin Walker, with two other men. William MacEwan Duff
had received an Undesirable Discharge from the Army on June 2, 1964,
by reason of unfitness due to Fraudulent Entry in the Army
(concealment of other service). His record contained a letter
entitled: "Fraudulent Entry" that stated: "During the entire period of
time EM has been assigned he continually cause trouble because of his
refusal to tell the truth." Duff came to Dallas where he married
Frances Barnard. The marriage was annulled after two weeks.
In June 1963 two private investigators hired by General Edwin Walker
told the Dallas Police Department that Duff was planning to kill
Walker. These were the two men named by Duff as plotting to kill
Walker. Duff was arrested and polygraphed. The polygraph test
indicated he had no knowledge of the Walker Incident.
OSWALD WAS UNSURE OF THE OUTCOME OF WALKER INCIDENT
The FBI reported: "Dallas report of S.A. WARREN C. DeBRUEYS dated
December 8, 1963, on pages 284 and 285 set out interviews of Marina
Oswald on December 3, 1963, and December 4, 1963. She advised during
the Spring of 1963 they resided on Neeley Street. One evening in the
Spring of 1963 her husband indicated he was going to typing class at
the Dallas evening school (Crozier Technical High School where OSWALD
last attended on April 8, 1963) where he normally attended two or
three times a week. On this particular evening he was very late and
arrived home about midnight, very pale, agitated and excited at which
time he admitted trying to kill General Walker by shooting at Walker
with a rifle. Marina Oswald stated her husband normally would depart
the Neeley Street address sometime between 6:00 p.m. and 7:00 p.m.
returning home about 9:00 p.m."
In 1964 Marina told the Bureau: "When he came back, I asked him what
happened. He was very pale. I don't remember the exact time, but it
was very late. And he told me not to ask him any questions. He only
told me he had shot at General Edwin Walker." OSWALD went on that he
did not know if he had hit General Edwin Walker; when he learned from
the newspapers the next day that he had missed, he told her he was
"sorry that he had not hit him." Marina Oswald told the HSCA: "[When
he returned late that evening] he turned the radio on and he was very
pale and he was listening to the news, changing from station to
station. I ask him what it was all about, and he said that he tried to
shoot General Edwin Walker. I told him, how dare you take somebody's
life and you should not do things like that, I mean you have no right
to do it. He said well if somebody shot Hitler at the right time you
will do justice to humanity so since I do not know anything about the
man I should not talk about it." [Marina's HSCA Test. pg. 383] In 1994
Marina Oswald told this researcher: "All I can tell you is what he
told me when he came home. And people have pointed out how nervous he
was after that, and he was cool as cucumber after Kennedy? Are you
asking me, did I make this up? No. He came home from work, it was
late, I found the note in one of the little closets. I confront him
when he came what it was all about? Then he turned the radio on. He
told me he shot at Walker."
ANALYSIS
If OSWALD shot at General Edwin Walker he would have known immediately
if he hit him or missed him. Marina Oswald pointed out to this
interviewer that all she had was her husband's word he shot at General
Edwin Walker. She was not a witness to the event. HEMMING was the
shooter and knew the outcome of the Walker incident. OSWALD was
exaggerating his importance in the event to his wife. He had not done
the shooting. If he had, he would have known that he missed.
EVIDENCE FABRICATED BY DEMOHRENSCHILDT
DeMohrenschildt told the Warren Commission that while he and his wife
were visiting the OSWALDS one evening at Neely Street, Marina Oswald
remarked that LEE bought a gun and showed it to Mrs. DeMohrenschildt.
George DeMohrenschildt told the FBI that this visit occurred on
Saturday, April 13, 1963. That year Easter Sunday fell on April 14,
1963. The purpose of the visit was to deliver an Easter present to
OSWALD'S daughter. In 1964 Marina Oswald stated "when she had asked
her husband what he had done with the rifle, he replied that he had
buried it in the ground or had hidden it in some bushes. He also
mentioned a railroad track in this connection. She testified that
several days later, OSWALD recovered his rifle, and brought it back to
the apartment." Marina Oswald stated that OSWALD did not retrieve his
rifle until April 14, 1963.
Nonetheless, George DeMohrenschildt claimed he and OSWALD stood in the
front room talking, and Marina Oswald opened a closet to show Mrs.
DeMohrenschildt the gun; Mrs. DeMohrenschildt called out to her
husband in the next room. He did not get a look at it, but remembered
a telescopic sight. Marina Oswald told them LEE used it for target
shooting. George DeMohrenschildt noted he then "jokingly" asked LEE if
he had taken the shot at General Edwin Walker. LEE became tense, "sort
of shriveled," and made a face in answer to the question without
specifically answering it.
In a State Department interview at the American Embassy, Haiti, on
December 1963 the DeMohrenschildts claimed they had seen the rifle in
the Fall of 1962, and not the following Spring. In that interview,
they claimed the last time they had seen the OSWALDS was in January
1963, not April 1963; they were too busy preparing for their
forthcoming trip to Haiti to see LEE and Marina Oswald after that.
[HSCA V12 p52] The HSCA asked Marina Oswald whether she exhibited the
rifle to the DeMohrenschildts: "I cannot tell you that, not because I
am hiding, but because I cannot recall." [HSCA V12 p301]
In George DeMohrenschildt's unpublished manuscript, he blamed the
Walker incident on a Jew: "There is another thing which makes me
believe that LEE possibly tried to shoot General Edwin Walker. A man,
whose name I do not recall, a Jewish man, whom LEE met at Ford's
Christmas party, described General Edwin Walker as the most dangerous
man in the United States, a potential neo-fascilst [sic] leader. I
noticed that LEE kept on asking why. And the other fellow explained
clearly his reasons. LEE might have been influenced by this
statement." Marina Oswald told this interviewer in 1994: "I think he
waited two days ...
read more =BB
--
-------------------- http://NewsReader.Com/ --------------------
Usenet Newsgroup Service $9.95/Month 30GB
timstter
2012-01-01 00:11:52 UTC
Permalink
Post by t***@cox.net
NEVER any citation from this guy ! ! !
Post by timstter
TOP POST
There appears nothing there, apart from speculation, to indicate that
Hemming had anything to do with it.
What about the photos of Walker's house found among Oswald's
possessions after JFK was shot?
Marina's recall rings true, as they also found a photo of some railway
tracks near Walker's home, which was apparently near where Oswald
concealed the rifle.
Regards,
Tim Brennan
Sydney, Australia
*Newsgroup(s) Commentator*
Post by Raymond
CLOSE CALL
Rifleman Takes Shot at Walker
by Eddie Hughes
A gunman with a high powered rifle tried to kill former Major General
Edwin Walker at his home Wednesday night, police said, and missed the
controversial crusader by less than an inch. Walker was working on his
income tax at 9:30 p.m. when the bullet, identified as a 30.06 crashed
through a rear window and slammed though a wall next to him. Police
said a slight movement by Walker apparently saved his life. 'Some one
had a perfect bead on him,'said Detective Ira Van Cleave, 'Whoever it
was certainly wanted to kill him.'
"Walker dug out several fragments of the shell's jacket from his right
sleeve and was still shaking glass and slivers of the bullet out of
his hair when reporters arrived. Walker said he returned to his Dallas
home Monday after an extensive coast-to-coast crusade which he called
'Midnight Alert.' It was on Monday night that one of his assistants
noticed a late modeled unlicenced car parked without lights in the
alley behind the Walker house at 4011 Turtle Creek. The car remained
there for about 30 minutes while several occupants once walked up to
the back door to look in, then left. Asked if he had any idea who shot
at him, Walker replied: 'There are plenty of people on the other side.
You don't have to go overseas to earn a Purple Heart. I've been saying
the front was right here at home. When I saw the hole in the wall I
went upstairs and got my gun, then went outside to take a look. I
didn't see anybody so I went back in the house and notified police."
TELEPHONE INTERVIEW WITH WALKER
In May 1977 I questioned General Edwin Walker: "I don't think the
Warren Commission would have found out if it was OSWALD unless they
had to and were sure of that. He did not deliberately miss. He was
dead on me with a telescopic sight. I didn't move. He hit the window
framework and the bullet was deflected. There were two people in the
alley and they were seen by a kid out in the alley 15 years old that
was carpentering with his daddy and he told the police there were two
men in the alley...there were two cars. The kid saw them sitting in
the church parking lot, the two men got in the cars and drove away. I
never heard of OSWALD or knew he was at a DRE meeting."
THE TRAJECTORY
In 1970 General Edwin Walker recalled, "In my home window today there
is a perfect bullet hole through a copper strip." [ltr. Walker/Russell
3.11.70] =A0Dallas Police photographs revealed the bullet nicked the
window frame. The trajectory of the high powered bullet would have
been changed as a result of this. No tests were ever conducted by the
Warren Commission on General Edwin Walker's windows, so it was
difficult to determine precisely what role they played. Double click
here to see a photo of Walker's window. [Walker.JPEG] The bullet
whizzed by General Edwin Walker's arm (he said he had been hit in the
right arm by wood, glass or bullet fragments), passed through a wall,
then landed on a stack of packages of papers in an adjoining room. The
gunman rested his rifle on a wooden fence, slightly chipping it in the
process, and had a clear downhill shot at General Edwin Walker.
General Edwin Walker could have been easily killed, but only one shot
was fired.
HOSTY ASSIGNED THE WALKER CASE
On June 6, 1963, S.A. Hosty was informed by an ex-employee of General
Walker, William MacEwan Duff, that he was involved in an arrangement
to kill General Edwin Walker, with two other men. William MacEwan Duff
had received an Undesirable Discharge from the Army on June 2, 1964,
by reason of unfitness due to Fraudulent Entry in the Army
(concealment of other service). His record contained a letter
entitled: "Fraudulent Entry" that stated: "During the entire period of
time EM has been assigned he continually cause trouble because of his
refusal to tell the truth." Duff came to Dallas where he married
Frances Barnard. The marriage was annulled after two weeks.
In June 1963 two private investigators hired by General Edwin Walker
told the Dallas Police Department that Duff was planning to kill
Walker. These were the two men named by Duff as plotting to kill
Walker. Duff was arrested and polygraphed. The polygraph test
indicated he had no knowledge of the Walker Incident.
OSWALD WAS UNSURE OF THE OUTCOME OF WALKER INCIDENT
The FBI reported: "Dallas report of S.A. WARREN C. DeBRUEYS dated
December 8, 1963, on pages 284 and 285 set out interviews of Marina
Oswald on December 3, 1963, and December 4, 1963. She advised during
the Spring of 1963 they resided on Neeley Street. One evening in the
Spring of 1963 her husband indicated he was going to typing class at
the Dallas evening school (Crozier Technical High School where OSWALD
last attended on April 8, 1963) where he normally attended two or
three times a week. On this particular evening he was very late and
arrived home about midnight, very pale, agitated and excited at which
time he admitted trying to kill General Walker by shooting at Walker
with a rifle. Marina Oswald stated her husband normally would depart
the Neeley Street address sometime between 6:00 p.m. and 7:00 p.m.
returning home about 9:00 p.m."
In 1964 Marina told the Bureau: "When he came back, I asked him what
happened. He was very pale. I don't remember the exact time, but it
was very late. And he told me not to ask him any questions. He only
told me he had shot at General Edwin Walker." OSWALD went on that he
did not know if he had hit General Edwin Walker; when he learned from
the newspapers the next day that he had missed, he told her he was
"sorry that he had not hit him." Marina Oswald told the HSCA: "[When
he returned late that evening] he turned the radio on and he was very
pale and he was listening to the news, changing from station to
station. I ask him what it was all about, and he said that he tried to
shoot General Edwin Walker. I told him, how dare you take somebody's
life and you should not do things like that, I mean you have no right
to do it. He said well if somebody shot Hitler at the right time you
will do justice to humanity so since I do not know anything about the
man I should not talk about it." [Marina's HSCA Test. pg. 383] In 1994
Marina Oswald told this researcher: "All I can tell you is what he
told me when he came home. And people have pointed out how nervous he
was after that, and he was cool as cucumber after Kennedy? Are you
asking me, did I make this up? No. He came home from work, it was
late, I found the note in one of the little closets. I confront him
when he came what it was all about? Then he turned the radio on. He
told me he shot at Walker."
ANALYSIS
If OSWALD shot at General Edwin Walker he would have known immediately
if he hit him or missed him. Marina Oswald pointed out to this
interviewer that all she had was her husband's word he shot at General
Edwin Walker. She was not a witness to the event. HEMMING was the
shooter and knew the outcome of the Walker incident. OSWALD was
exaggerating his importance in the event to his wife. He had not done
the shooting. If he had, he would have known that he missed.
EVIDENCE FABRICATED BY DEMOHRENSCHILDT
DeMohrenschildt told the Warren Commission that while he and his wife
were visiting the OSWALDS one evening at Neely Street, Marina Oswald
remarked that LEE bought a gun and showed it to Mrs. DeMohrenschildt.
George DeMohrenschildt told the FBI that this visit occurred on
Saturday, April 13, 1963. That year Easter Sunday fell on April 14,
1963. The purpose of the visit was to deliver an Easter present to
OSWALD'S daughter. In 1964 Marina Oswald stated "when she had asked
her husband what he had done with the rifle, he replied that he had
buried it in the ground or had hidden it in some bushes. He also
mentioned a railroad track in this connection. She testified that
several days later, OSWALD recovered his rifle, and brought it back to
the apartment." Marina Oswald stated that OSWALD did not retrieve his
rifle until April 14, 1963.
Nonetheless, George DeMohrenschildt claimed he and OSWALD stood in the
front room talking, and Marina Oswald opened a closet to show Mrs.
DeMohrenschildt the gun; Mrs. DeMohrenschildt called out to her
husband in the next room. He did not get a look at it, but remembered
a telescopic sight. Marina Oswald told them LEE used it for target
shooting. George DeMohrenschildt noted he then "jokingly" asked LEE if
he had taken the shot at General Edwin Walker. LEE became tense, "sort
of shriveled," and made a face in answer to the question without
specifically answering it.
...
read more »
Huh? You don't know where to find the photos of Walker's house etc in
the WC volumes?

Concerned Regards,

Tim Brennan
Sydney, Australia
*Newsgroup(s) Commentator*
t***@cox.net
2011-12-31 02:32:54 UTC
Permalink
he bullet recovered from the Walker shooting was "STEEL_JCKETED".
ccording to the Original DPD Report.
SEE>>
http://www.whokilledjfk.net/Walker.htm
Post by Raymond
CLOSE CALL
Rifleman Takes Shot at Walker
by Eddie Hughes
A gunman with a high powered rifle tried to kill former Major General
Edwin Walker at his home Wednesday night, police said, and missed the
controversial crusader by less than an inch. Walker was working on his
income tax at 9:30 p.m. when the bullet, identified as a 30.06 crashed
through a rear window and slammed though a wall next to him. Police
said a slight movement by Walker apparently saved his life. 'Some one
had a perfect bead on him,'said Detective Ira Van Cleave, 'Whoever it
was certainly wanted to kill him.'
"Walker dug out several fragments of the shell's jacket from his right
sleeve and was still shaking glass and slivers of the bullet out of
his hair when reporters arrived. Walker said he returned to his Dallas
home Monday after an extensive coast-to-coast crusade which he called
'Midnight Alert.' It was on Monday night that one of his assistants
noticed a late modeled unlicenced car parked without lights in the
alley behind the Walker house at 4011 Turtle Creek. The car remained
there for about 30 minutes while several occupants once walked up to
the back door to look in, then left. Asked if he had any idea who shot
at him, Walker replied: 'There are plenty of people on the other side.
You don't have to go overseas to earn a Purple Heart. I've been saying
the front was right here at home. When I saw the hole in the wall I
went upstairs and got my gun, then went outside to take a look. I
didn't see anybody so I went back in the house and notified police."
TELEPHONE INTERVIEW WITH WALKER
In May 1977 I questioned General Edwin Walker: "I don't think the
Warren Commission would have found out if it was OSWALD unless they
had to and were sure of that. He did not deliberately miss. He was
dead on me with a telescopic sight. I didn't move. He hit the window
framework and the bullet was deflected. There were two people in the
alley and they were seen by a kid out in the alley 15 years old that
was carpentering with his daddy and he told the police there were two
men in the alley...there were two cars. The kid saw them sitting in
the church parking lot, the two men got in the cars and drove away. I
never heard of OSWALD or knew he was at a DRE meeting."
THE TRAJECTORY
In 1970 General Edwin Walker recalled, "In my home window today there
is a perfect bullet hole through a copper strip." [ltr. Walker/Russell
3.11.70] Dallas Police photographs revealed the bullet nicked the
window frame. The trajectory of the high powered bullet would have
been changed as a result of this. No tests were ever conducted by the
Warren Commission on General Edwin Walker's windows, so it was
difficult to determine precisely what role they played. Double click
here to see a photo of Walker's window. [Walker.JPEG] The bullet
whizzed by General Edwin Walker's arm (he said he had been hit in the
right arm by wood, glass or bullet fragments), passed through a wall,
then landed on a stack of packages of papers in an adjoining room. The
gunman rested his rifle on a wooden fence, slightly chipping it in the
process, and had a clear downhill shot at General Edwin Walker.
General Edwin Walker could have been easily killed, but only one shot
was fired.
HOSTY ASSIGNED THE WALKER CASE
On June 6, 1963, S.A. Hosty was informed by an ex-employee of General
Walker, William MacEwan Duff, that he was involved in an arrangement
to kill General Edwin Walker, with two other men. William MacEwan Duff
had received an Undesirable Discharge from the Army on June 2, 1964,
by reason of unfitness due to Fraudulent Entry in the Army
(concealment of other service). His record contained a letter
entitled: "Fraudulent Entry" that stated: "During the entire period of
time EM has been assigned he continually cause trouble because of his
refusal to tell the truth." Duff came to Dallas where he married
Frances Barnard. The marriage was annulled after two weeks.
In June 1963 two private investigators hired by General Edwin Walker
told the Dallas Police Department that Duff was planning to kill
Walker. These were the two men named by Duff as plotting to kill
Walker. Duff was arrested and polygraphed. The polygraph test
indicated he had no knowledge of the Walker Incident.
OSWALD WAS UNSURE OF THE OUTCOME OF WALKER INCIDENT
The FBI reported: "Dallas report of S.A. WARREN C. DeBRUEYS dated
December 8, 1963, on pages 284 and 285 set out interviews of Marina
Oswald on December 3, 1963, and December 4, 1963. She advised during
the Spring of 1963 they resided on Neeley Street. One evening in the
Spring of 1963 her husband indicated he was going to typing class at
the Dallas evening school (Crozier Technical High School where OSWALD
last attended on April 8, 1963) where he normally attended two or
three times a week. On this particular evening he was very late and
arrived home about midnight, very pale, agitated and excited at which
time he admitted trying to kill General Walker by shooting at Walker
with a rifle. Marina Oswald stated her husband normally would depart
the Neeley Street address sometime between 6:00 p.m. and 7:00 p.m.
returning home about 9:00 p.m."
In 1964 Marina told the Bureau: "When he came back, I asked him what
happened. He was very pale. I don't remember the exact time, but it
was very late. And he told me not to ask him any questions. He only
told me he had shot at General Edwin Walker." OSWALD went on that he
did not know if he had hit General Edwin Walker; when he learned from
the newspapers the next day that he had missed, he told her he was
"sorry that he had not hit him." Marina Oswald told the HSCA: "[When
he returned late that evening] he turned the radio on and he was very
pale and he was listening to the news, changing from station to
station. I ask him what it was all about, and he said that he tried to
shoot General Edwin Walker. I told him, how dare you take somebody's
life and you should not do things like that, I mean you have no right
to do it. He said well if somebody shot Hitler at the right time you
will do justice to humanity so since I do not know anything about the
man I should not talk about it." [Marina's HSCA Test. pg. 383] In 1994
Marina Oswald told this researcher: "All I can tell you is what he
told me when he came home. And people have pointed out how nervous he
was after that, and he was cool as cucumber after Kennedy? Are you
asking me, did I make this up? No. He came home from work, it was
late, I found the note in one of the little closets. I confront him
when he came what it was all about? Then he turned the radio on. He
told me he shot at Walker."
ANALYSIS
If OSWALD shot at General Edwin Walker he would have known immediately
if he hit him or missed him. Marina Oswald pointed out to this
interviewer that all she had was her husband's word he shot at General
Edwin Walker. She was not a witness to the event. HEMMING was the
shooter and knew the outcome of the Walker incident. OSWALD was
exaggerating his importance in the event to his wife. He had not done
the shooting. If he had, he would have known that he missed.
EVIDENCE FABRICATED BY DEMOHRENSCHILDT
DeMohrenschildt told the Warren Commission that while he and his wife
were visiting the OSWALDS one evening at Neely Street, Marina Oswald
remarked that LEE bought a gun and showed it to Mrs. DeMohrenschildt.
George DeMohrenschildt told the FBI that this visit occurred on
Saturday, April 13, 1963. That year Easter Sunday fell on April 14,
1963. The purpose of the visit was to deliver an Easter present to
OSWALD'S daughter. In 1964 Marina Oswald stated "when she had asked
her husband what he had done with the rifle, he replied that he had
buried it in the ground or had hidden it in some bushes. He also
mentioned a railroad track in this connection. She testified that
several days later, OSWALD recovered his rifle, and brought it back to
the apartment." Marina Oswald stated that OSWALD did not retrieve his
rifle until April 14, 1963.
Nonetheless, George DeMohrenschildt claimed he and OSWALD stood in the
front room talking, and Marina Oswald opened a closet to show Mrs.
DeMohrenschildt the gun; Mrs. DeMohrenschildt called out to her
husband in the next room. He did not get a look at it, but remembered
a telescopic sight. Marina Oswald told them LEE used it for target
shooting. George DeMohrenschildt noted he then "jokingly" asked LEE if
he had taken the shot at General Edwin Walker. LEE became tense, "sort
of shriveled," and made a face in answer to the question without
specifically answering it.
In a State Department interview at the American Embassy, Haiti, on
December 1963 the DeMohrenschildts claimed they had seen the rifle in
the Fall of 1962, and not the following Spring. In that interview,
they claimed the last time they had seen the OSWALDS was in January
1963, not April 1963; they were too busy preparing for their
forthcoming trip to Haiti to see LEE and Marina Oswald after that.
[HSCA V12 p52] The HSCA asked Marina Oswald whether she exhibited the
rifle to the DeMohrenschildts: "I cannot tell you that, not because I
am hiding, but because I cannot recall." [HSCA V12 p301]
In George DeMohrenschildt's unpublished manuscript, he blamed the
Walker incident on a Jew: "There is another thing which makes me
believe that LEE possibly tried to shoot General Edwin Walker. A man,
whose name I do not recall, a Jewish man, whom LEE met at Ford's
Christmas party, described General Edwin Walker as the most dangerous
man in the United States, a potential neo-fascilst [sic] leader. I
noticed that LEE kept on asking why. And the other fellow explained
clearly his reasons. LEE might have been influenced by this
statement." Marina Oswald told this interviewer in 1994: "I think he
waited two days before recovering the rifle. They did come and bring
that. If it was Easter it had to be Sunday. I liked DeMohrenschildt
very much."
EVIDENCE - THE NOTE
OSWALD left a note for Marina Oswald in Russian with practical
instructions in case the Walker mission ended in failure. Marina
Oswald testified she became agitated the night of the Walker incident
when she found the note in OSWALD'S room; she entered the room
contrary to his instructions when she began to worry about his
absence. She allegedly kept the note, to turn over to the authorities
"if something like that should be repeated again." When asked whether
LEE requested she return the note, she claimed: "He forgot about it."
Marina Oswald did not bring the note to the attention of the Dallas
Police Department, but kept the note in a Russian book entitled Useful
Advice. Ruth Paine accidentally turned the note over to the Dallas
Police Department on December 2, 1963. Michael Paine: "I accept that
he took a shot at Walker and nothing came of it. I think he probably
meant to kill him, but Walker had the good fortune to duck at the
right moment. He wrote a letter and left it with Marina Oswald just
before he went out that night. My wife was raked over the coals by the
FBI when she quite unwittingly sent that letter to Marina Oswald. Ruth
was sending Marina things she thought Marina would like, and this was
a book written by Doctor Spock on babies. The FBI came back thinking
she was trying to smuggle important information to Marina. So they
grilled her, brought her to tears, and she was totally ignorant of
that letter being in the book. She had never seen it. And she was very
angry at Marina for keeping from her that LEE had done that. Later on,
I remember discussing with Ruth why she had done that: Marina Oswald
was afraid of being deported back to Russia." Ruth Paine: "This was a
book that Marina had read to me from. It was child raising manual.
After she left on November 23, 1963, I expected her to come back, but
she didn't. So every day or so I would send something the baby that
might need - a change of clothing, etc. Mail began to come for her. I
would give it to the police. The FBI had overlooked it. Later, I
understood Marina had hidden a note in a book. First I heard about it,
two guys from the Secret Service came and asked if I knew anything
about it. They presented it as if I did know something about it. I
(1) This is the key to the mailbox which is located in the main post
office in the city on Ervay Street. This is the same street where the
drugstore, in which you always waited is located. You will find the
mailbox in the post office which is located 4 blocks from the
drugstore on that street. I paid for the box last month so don't worry
about it.
(2) Send the information as to what has happened to me to the Embassy
and include newspaper clippings (should there be anything about me in
the newspapers). I believe that the Embassy will come quickly to your
assistance upon learning everything.
(3) I paid the house rent on the second so don't worry about it.
(4) Recently I also paid for water and gas.
(5) The money from work will possibly be coming. The money will be
sent to our post office box. Go to the bank and cash the check.
(6) You can either throw out or give my clothing etc. away Do not keep
these. However I prefer you hold on to my personal papers (military,
civil etc.)
(7) Certain of my documents are in the small blue valise.
(8) The address book can be found on my table in the study should you
need same.
(9) We have friends here. The Red Cross also will help you. (Red Cross
in English). [sic]
(10) I left you as much money as I could, $60 on the second of the
month. You and the baby (apparently) can live for another two months
using $10 per week.
(11) If I am alive and taken prisoner, the city jail is located at the
end of the bridge though which we always passed on going to the city
(right in the beginning of the city after crossing the bridge).
ANALYSIS
The note referred to the Walker Incident.
1. "This is the key to the mailbox which is located in the main post
office in the city on Ervay Street. This is the same street where the
drugstore, in which you always waited is located. You will find the
mailbox in the post office which is located 4 blocks from the
drugstore on that street. I paid for the box last month so don't worry
about it."
OSWALD gave Marina Oswald the key to his post office box for the first
time. He had previously withheld it from her. OSWALD had Marina Oswald
wait in a drugstore rather than accompany him into the main post
office on Ervay Street, where OSWALD rented Box 2915 from October 9,
1962, to May 14, 1963. What was he up to at the Post Office?
The Warren Commission: "Although the possibilities of investigation in
this area are limited, there is no evidence that any of [OSWALD'S
three boxes] were ever used for the surreptitious receipt of
messages...The single outstanding key was recovered from OSWALD
immediately after he was taken in custody." [WR p312] In 1994 Marina
Oswald did not recall having been told to wait in the drugstore while
her husband went to the post office: "It was just to remind me where
it was."
2. "Send the information as to what has happened to me to the Embassy
and include newspaper clippings (should there be anything about me in
the newspapers). I believe that the Embassy will come quickly to your
assistance upon learning everything."
OSWALD feared his action might escape notice not only by the
Washington newspapers, where the Soviet Embassy was located, but by
the local media in Dallas. General Edwin Walker was headline news in
1963; even the anonymous pot shot made the front page of the Dallas
Morning News. OSWALD was incredibly stupid.
OSWALD was about to commit a political act which would be viewed
sympathetically by the Soviets. According to Marina Oswald: "LEE said
he was a very bad man, that he was a fascist, that he was the leader
of a fascist organization...if someone had killed Hitler in time it
would have saved many lives." [WR p406]
3. "I paid the house rent on the second so don't worry about it.
Recently I also paid for water and gas. The money from work will
possibly be coming. The money will be sent to our post office box. Go
to the bank and cash the check." The reference to OSWALD'S check
having been mailed to his Post Office Box meant the letter was written
sometime after April 5, 1963, when he lost his job at Jagger-Chiles-
Stoval.
4. "You can either throw out or give my clothing etc. away Do not keep
these. However I prefer you hold on to my personal papers (military,
civil etc.) Certain of my documents are in the small blue valise. The
address book can be found on my table in the study should you need
same." OSWALD was about to commit a crime that could result in a stiff
prison sentence.
5. "We have friends here. The Red Cross also will help you. (Red Cross
in English). [sic] I left you as much money as I could, $60 on the
second of the month. You and the baby (apparently) can live for
another two months using $10 per week. If I am alive and taken
prisoner, the city jail is located at the end of the bridge though
which we always passed on going to the city (right in the beginning of
the city after crossing the bridge)." OSWALD was going after a former
General , a tough customer. He could have been killed or taken
prisoner. [DeMohrenschildt/W WR p282; WR pp. 416, 738, 592; HSCA R pp.
98, 60, 62]
Marina Oswald told this researcher 1994: "If he was apprehended as you
said, but something more will be printed, then identify people who
tried to shoot at Walker as it was in newspapers, you follow me? Maybe
the Embassy would help me to go back to Russia? He was giving
instructions where to go if he doesn't come home. Maybe he was with a
group and maybe they would kill him. It's unlikely Walker would have
killed him. The police aren't going to kill him. The message of the
thing was that he had a mission or had another second life. He did not
indulge in a explanation to me. I knew nothing about it. So, if
something happened to me, he was just giving directions to go to get
help. Maybe somehow also he betrays himself by saying it. That's a
giveaway without him realizing that. The note did not say he was going
to kill Walker. He came home without that rifle. What was all that
about? If HEMMING put my husband up to this, the main thing was to
show LEE was a killer."
BULLET PROBABLY FIRED FROM A MANNLICHER-CARCANO
Cont'd
http://mcadams.posc.mu.edu/weberman/nodule10.htm
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timstter
2012-01-07 04:08:41 UTC
Permalink
Post by t***@cox.net
he bullet recovered from the Walker shooting was "STEEL_JCKETED".
ccording to the Original DPD Report.
SEE>>http://www.whokilledjfk.net/Walker.htm
Post by Raymond
CLOSE CALL
Rifleman Takes Shot at Walker
by Eddie Hughes
A gunman with a high powered rifle tried to kill former Major General
Edwin Walker at his home Wednesday night, police said, and missed the
controversial crusader by less than an inch. Walker was working on his
income tax at 9:30 p.m. when the bullet, identified as a 30.06 crashed
through a rear window and slammed though a wall next to him. Police
said a slight movement by Walker apparently saved his life. 'Some one
had a perfect bead on him,'said Detective Ira Van Cleave, 'Whoever it
was certainly wanted to kill him.'
"Walker dug out several fragments of the shell's jacket from his right
sleeve and was still shaking glass and slivers of the bullet out of
his hair when reporters arrived. Walker said he returned to his Dallas
home Monday after an extensive coast-to-coast crusade which he called
'Midnight Alert.' It was on Monday night that one of his assistants
noticed a late modeled unlicenced car parked without lights in the
alley behind the Walker house at 4011 Turtle Creek. The car remained
there for about 30 minutes while several occupants once walked up to
the back door to look in, then left. Asked if he had any idea who shot
at him, Walker replied: 'There are plenty of people on the other side.
You don't have to go overseas to earn a Purple Heart. I've been saying
the front was right here at home. When I saw the hole in the wall I
went upstairs and got my gun, then went outside to take a look. I
didn't see anybody so I went back in the house and notified police."
TELEPHONE INTERVIEW WITH WALKER
In May 1977 I questioned General Edwin Walker: "I don't think the
Warren Commission would have found out if it was OSWALD unless they
had to and were sure of that. He did not deliberately miss. He was
dead on me with a telescopic sight. I didn't move. He hit the window
framework and the bullet was deflected. There were two people in the
alley and they were seen by a kid out in the alley 15 years old that
was carpentering with his daddy and he told the police there were two
men in the alley...there were two cars. The kid saw them sitting in
the church parking lot, the two men got in the cars and drove away. I
never heard of OSWALD or knew he was at a DRE meeting."
THE TRAJECTORY
In 1970 General Edwin Walker recalled, "In my home window today there
is a perfect bullet hole through a copper strip." [ltr. Walker/Russell
3.11.70]  Dallas Police photographs revealed the bullet nicked the
window frame. The trajectory of the high powered bullet would have
been changed as a result of this. No tests were ever conducted by the
Warren Commission on General Edwin Walker's windows, so it was
difficult to determine precisely what role they played. Double click
here to see a photo of Walker's window. [Walker.JPEG] The bullet
whizzed by General Edwin Walker's arm (he said he had been hit in the
right arm by wood, glass or bullet fragments), passed through a wall,
then landed on a stack of packages of papers in an adjoining room. The
gunman rested his rifle on a wooden fence, slightly chipping it in the
process, and had a clear downhill shot at General Edwin Walker.
General Edwin Walker could have been easily killed, but only one shot
was fired.
HOSTY ASSIGNED THE WALKER CASE
On June 6, 1963, S.A. Hosty was informed by an ex-employee of General
Walker, William MacEwan Duff, that he was involved in an arrangement
to kill General Edwin Walker, with two other men. William MacEwan Duff
had received an Undesirable Discharge from the Army on June 2, 1964,
by reason of unfitness due to Fraudulent Entry in the Army
(concealment of other service). His record contained a letter
entitled: "Fraudulent Entry" that stated: "During the entire period of
time EM has been assigned he continually cause trouble because of his
refusal to tell the truth." Duff came to Dallas where he married
Frances Barnard. The marriage was annulled after two weeks.
In June 1963 two private investigators hired by General Edwin Walker
told the Dallas Police Department that Duff was planning to kill
Walker. These were the two men named by Duff as plotting to kill
Walker. Duff was arrested and polygraphed. The polygraph test
indicated he had no knowledge of the Walker Incident.
OSWALD WAS UNSURE OF THE OUTCOME OF WALKER INCIDENT
The FBI reported: "Dallas report of S.A. WARREN C. DeBRUEYS dated
December 8, 1963, on pages 284 and 285 set out interviews of Marina
Oswald on December 3, 1963, and December 4, 1963. She advised during
the Spring of 1963 they resided on Neeley Street. One evening in the
Spring of 1963 her husband indicated he was going to typing class at
the Dallas evening school (Crozier Technical High School where OSWALD
last attended on April 8, 1963) where he normally attended two or
three times a week. On this particular evening he was very late and
arrived home about midnight, very pale, agitated and excited at which
time he admitted trying to kill General Walker by shooting at Walker
with a rifle. Marina Oswald stated her husband normally would depart
the Neeley Street address sometime between 6:00 p.m. and 7:00 p.m.
returning home about 9:00 p.m."
In 1964 Marina told the Bureau: "When he came back, I asked him what
happened. He was very pale. I don't remember the exact time, but it
was very late. And he told me not to ask him any questions. He only
told me he had shot at General Edwin Walker." OSWALD went on that he
did not know if he had hit General Edwin Walker; when he learned from
the newspapers the next day that he had missed, he told her he was
"sorry that he had not hit him." Marina Oswald told the HSCA: "[When
he returned late that evening] he turned the radio on and he was very
pale and he was listening to the news, changing from station to
station. I ask him what it was all about, and he said that he tried to
shoot General Edwin Walker. I told him, how dare you take somebody's
life and you should not do things like that, I mean you have no right
to do it. He said well if somebody shot Hitler at the right time you
will do justice to humanity so since I do not know anything about the
man I should not talk about it." [Marina's HSCA Test. pg. 383] In 1994
Marina Oswald told this researcher: "All I can tell you is what he
told me when he came home. And people have pointed out how nervous he
was after that, and he was cool as cucumber after Kennedy? Are you
asking me, did I make this up? No. He came home from work, it was
late, I found the note in one of the little closets. I confront him
when he came what it was all about? Then he turned the radio on. He
told me he shot at Walker."
ANALYSIS
If OSWALD shot at General Edwin Walker he would have known immediately
if he hit him or missed him. Marina Oswald pointed out to this
interviewer that all she had was her husband's word he shot at General
Edwin Walker. She was not a witness to the event. HEMMING was the
shooter and knew the outcome of the Walker incident. OSWALD was
exaggerating his importance in the event to his wife. He had not done
the shooting. If he had, he would have known that he missed.
EVIDENCE FABRICATED BY DEMOHRENSCHILDT
DeMohrenschildt told the Warren Commission that while he and his wife
were visiting the OSWALDS one evening at Neely Street, Marina Oswald
remarked that LEE bought a gun and showed it to Mrs. DeMohrenschildt.
George DeMohrenschildt told the FBI that this visit occurred on
Saturday, April 13, 1963. That year Easter Sunday fell on April 14,
1963. The purpose of the visit was to deliver an Easter present to
OSWALD'S daughter. In 1964 Marina Oswald stated "when she had asked
her husband what he had done with the rifle, he replied that he had
buried it in the ground or had hidden it in some bushes. He also
mentioned a railroad track in this connection. She testified that
several days later, OSWALD recovered his rifle, and brought it back to
the apartment." Marina Oswald stated that OSWALD did not retrieve his
rifle until April 14, 1963.
Nonetheless, George DeMohrenschildt claimed he and OSWALD stood in the
front room talking, and Marina Oswald opened a closet to show Mrs.
DeMohrenschildt the gun; Mrs. DeMohrenschildt called out to her
husband in the next room. He did not get a look at it, but remembered
a telescopic sight. Marina Oswald told them LEE used it for target
shooting. George DeMohrenschildt noted he then "jokingly" asked LEE if
he had taken the shot at General Edwin Walker. LEE became tense, "sort
of shriveled," and made a face in answer to the question without
specifically answering it.
In a State Department interview at the American Embassy, Haiti, on
December 1963 the DeMohrenschildts claimed they had seen the rifle in
the Fall of 1962, and not the following Spring. In that interview,
they claimed the last time they had seen the OSWALDS was in January
1963, not April 1963; they were too busy preparing for their
forthcoming trip to Haiti to see LEE and Marina Oswald after that.
[HSCA V12 p52] The HSCA asked Marina Oswald whether she exhibited the
rifle to the DeMohrenschildts: "I cannot tell you that, not because I
am hiding, but because I cannot recall." [HSCA V12 p301]
In George DeMohrenschildt's unpublished manuscript, he blamed the
Walker incident on a Jew: "There is another
...
No it wasn't. It's COPPER jacketed, just like the bullets recovered from
the JFK assassination.

The term *steel jacketed* as used in the DPD police reports is simply a
generic term for a metal jacketed bullet.

Stop making stuff up, tomnln.

Corrective Regards,

Tim Brennan
Sydney, Australia
*Newsgroup(s) Commentator*
Gil Jesus
2012-01-08 19:17:08 UTC
Permalink
Post by Raymond
CLOSE CALL
Rifleman Takes Shot at Walker
by Eddie Hughes
A gunman with a high powered rifle tried to kill former Major General
Edwin Walker at his home Wednesday night, police said, and missed the
controversial crusader by less than an inch. Walker was working on his
income tax at 9:30 p.m. when the bullet, identified as a 30.06 crashed
through a rear window and slammed though a wall next to him. Police
Loading Image...
Jason Burke
2012-01-09 01:55:14 UTC
Permalink
Post by Gil Jesus
Post by Raymond
CLOSE CALL
Rifleman Takes Shot at Walker
by Eddie Hughes
A gunman with a high powered rifle tried to kill former Major General
Edwin Walker at his home Wednesday night, police said, and missed the
controversial crusader by less than an inch. Walker was working on his
income tax at 9:30 p.m. when the bullet, identified as a 30.06 crashed
through a rear window and slammed though a wall next to him. Police
http://i39.tinypic.com/5v2n81.jpg
Why the hell your mama didn't realize that abortion on demand was a
viable option is perhaps the biggest question in this case.

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