Discussion:
Firearms Imports-Proposed Controls
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Raymond
2012-01-04 14:22:19 UTC
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Firearms Imports-Proposed Controls

"...Rep. Albert P. Morano (4th. Dist.Conn) proposed an amendment to
the Mutual Security act (of 1954) which would "prohibit the
importation or re importation into the United States (other than for
the Armed Forces of the United States) of arms and ammunition
originally manufactured for military purposes, or parts thereof,
except those which are curios or antiques and are not in condition to
be used as firearms.

" Influenced by arguments of 'dumping' of obsolete surplus arms by
foreign governments on the domestic market and the 'danger of their
use, the Committee on Foreign Affairs approved the Morano amendment
and included its provisions in H.R. 12181 which was introduced on
April 28. On the same day, Sen. John Kennedy of Massachusetts
introduced S. 3714, a companion measure to the Morano amendment, and
it was referred to the Senate Committee on Foreign Affairs.

"...The Morano substitute was defeated by a vote of 97 to 100."

"On may 13, Mr. Kennedy introduced another bill S. 3794 to modify
the restrictions contained in his first proposal as follows: 'Such
regulations shall prohibit the importation or re importation into the
United States (other than for the Armed Forces of the United States)
for resale of firearms manufactured for the Armed Forces of any
country, or parts thereof for reassembly, except those which are
curios or antiques or weapons of obsolete ignition incapable of using
a fixed cartridge or fixed shotgun shell."

This is from an article published in The American Rifleman of June
1958.
Apparently the bill failed.

From Time Magazine 1968:

"Two years before he became President, John F. Kennedy unsuccessfully
sought a ban on imports of foreign weapons which would have kept out
of the U.S. the $12.78 Mannlicher-Carcano Italian rifle that killed
him in 1963. Senator Robert F. Kennedy, declaring that, "It is past
time that we wipe this stain of violence from this land," and
testified in favor of a bill to tighten controls on handguns such as
the .22cal. Iver-Johnson eight-shot revolver that felled him on June
4."

From THE GUN by Bloomgarden. PP 133-134.
"The Western Cartridge Co.... manufactured a large quantity of 6.5
mm bullets for use by U.S. allies still equipped with MCs left over
from the war years. When NATO forces adopted a uniform cartridge for
new and improved weapons, millions of rounds made by Western and
shipped overseas were then found unnecessary and were returned to
America. The Office of Munitions Control at the Dept. of State
received a report from 'an informant of unconfirmed reliability' that
'in contravention of Section 414 B of the Mutual Security Act of 1954,
as amended. Some of the ammunition returned to the States was
furnished to the government of Greece under the Greek Aid Program in
1952 and 1953.


" The informant said that the ammunition was sent from Greece to
Canada sometime after Feb. 1, 1962 and that two million rounds in one
lot were brought into the U.S. and sold, although the law
specifically stated there could be no resale of ammunition supplied to
foreign governments by the U.S. under any foreign assistance program.
Transmitted throughout the country, these two million rounds turned up
in surplus gun shops, mail order houses and firearms stores."

This may all be correct. The point is that the ammo was made for
Italy to fight the Albanians. That, from the President of Western .
I'm sure some sharpies "Daisy - Chained" the ammo to make a buck and
it was moved around to lose its identity.

Canada played a big part in importing surplus weapons that ended up
in the U.S.. Empire, of
Montreal, bought hundreds of thousands of rifles from the Italian
government without keeping records of serial numbers. " Many were
collected from battlefields and places of improper storage and they
were in very poor condition. They were usually bought by the pound
rather than unit. Upon arrival in Canada, defective parts were removed
and saleable rifles were sometimes composed of parts of three or more
weapons." (WR)

A telephone canvas was made of hundreds of shops in the Dallas area
trying to locate who sold Western ammunition. Only two places were
located:

John T. Masen-Masen's Gun Shop on Harry Hines Blvd. and John Brinegar,
The Gun Shop, also on Harry Hines Blvd.

On March 26, 1964 Masen told the FBI that he had bought about ten
boxes of 6.5 Western ammo from Brinegar in early 1963 and sold them to
induviduals. He then bought another ten boxes from Brinegar. Since
this ammo was being used for deer hunting, Masen pulled the bullets
and reloaded with soft point (lead nose) ammo. Masen also told the FBI
that he had visited Mexico City during the summer of 63 and while
there visited the "Mendoza Brothers", who owned an arms manufacturing
plant.

Brinegar told the FBI that he had purchased one case of 6.5 Western
from the CENTURY ARMS COMPANY in St Albans , Vermont.

In 1962, after seeing it advertised for $45 per 1000 rounds. he
verified the 20 box sale to Masen and said that he had about six boxes
left. He also had put soft nose ammo in some of the Western ammo.
Brinegar said that many shops in the Dallas area sold 6.5 Western
ammo. He had seen it advertised.

Masen told the FBI that target practice was common in the Trinity
River bottom near his shop, which was near Love Field. He, himself,
used the river bottom to test fire weapons. Brinegar had his own
firing range, but said that because of the levee on both sides of the
river, about 35 feet high, it was ideal.

Both said they did not remember selling ammo to LHO.

On March 26, 1964, two boxes of this ammo were given to the FBI for
lab testing. One box from Brinegar (military load) and one box from
Masen (soft nose load).

Remember that Marina said that Lee test fired his rifle at "LOB"
Field. Perhaps it was in the Trinity River bottom near Brinegar's
shop. It is possible that LHO did buy his ammo there and Brinegar
just
didn't remember him, or...... he wasn't there
bigdog
2012-01-04 18:49:39 UTC
Permalink
Post by Raymond
Firearms Imports-Proposed Controls
"...Rep. Albert P. Morano (4th. Dist.Conn) proposed an amendment to
the Mutual Security act (of 1954) which would "prohibit the
importation or re importation into the United States (other than for
the Armed Forces of the United States) of arms and ammunition
originally manufactured for military purposes, or parts thereof,
except those which are curios or antiques and are not in condition to
be used as firearms.
  " Influenced by arguments of 'dumping' of obsolete surplus arms by
foreign governments on the domestic market and the 'danger of their
use, the Committee on Foreign Affairs approved the Morano amendment
and included its provisions in H.R. 12181 which was introduced on
April 28. On the same day, Sen. John Kennedy of Massachusetts
introduced S. 3714, a companion measure to the Morano amendment, and
it was referred to the Senate Committee on Foreign Affairs.
(snip)

All of that is very interesting, but what would have been the result
of a ban on imported rifles? If Oswald hadn't been able to buy a
Carcano, don't you think he would have just bought another rifle and
done the same thing?


The foreign weapons that would have fallen under this proposed ban are
no more deadly than domestically produced firearms. My guess is this
measure had little to do with public safety and more to do with
protectionism for American gun makers.


As for the handgun ban advocated by RFK, was it specific types of
handguns or all handguns that would have been banned. As with Oswald,
if Sirhan had been unable to buy his 8 shot Iver-Johnson, wouldn't he
have just bought another gun? Not that I would have the choice, but if
I was going to be shot, I think I would have a better chance of
survival if I got shot with a pipsqueak like that IJ revolver rather
than a bigger, more powerful gun. My first home defense weapon was an
Iver-Johnson .38 which was a piece of crap. A cop friend of mine
suggested I first fire it with my left hand so if the gun blew up, I
wouldn't have to learn to write with my left hand. I long ago replaced
that .38 with a 12 gauge, pump-action home security system.

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